Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Grifola frondosa (maitake) reveals a species partition separating eastern North American and Asian isolates

Qing Shen, David Michael Geiser, Daniel J. Royse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

A phylogenetic analysis was performed on 51 isolates of the commercially valuable basidiomycete, Grifola frondosa (maitake), using sequences from the Internal Transcribed Spacers and 5.8S region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and a portion of the β-tubulin gene. The β-tubulin gene provided more than twice as many variable characters as the ITS/5.8S regions. The isolates analyzed comprised 21 from eastern North America, 27 from Asia, one from Europe, and two of unknown geographic origin, one of which was the major US commercial production strain in use. Grifola sordulenta was used as an outgroup. Combined and separate analysis of both genes showed a partition separating Asian versus eastern North American isolates. Bootstrap analysis showed strong support for these clades in the β-tubulin data alone and in the combined data. The major commercial isolate of unknown geographic origin is apparently of Asian descent based on its grouping within the Asian clade. The single European isolate analyzed was distinct from both the eastern North American and Asian clades. These results indicate strong support for a species partition separating eastern North American and Asian isolates of G. frondosa, despite previous studies indicating no morphological distinction between them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)472-482
Number of pages11
JournalMycologia
Volume94
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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