Molecular profiling of 6,892 colorectal cancer samples suggests different possible treatment options specific to metastatic sites

Wafik S. El-Deiry, Namrata Vijayvergia, Joanne Xiu, Angelique Scicchitano, Bora Lim, Nelson S. Yee, Harold A. Harvey, Zoran Gatalica, Sandeep Reddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis with an overall 5-year survival of 13.1%. Therapies guided by tumor profiling have suggested benefit in advanced cancer. We used a multiplatform molecular profiling (MP) approach to identify key molecular changes that may provide therapeutic options not typically considered in mCRC. We evaluated 6892 mCRC referred to Caris Life Sciences by MP including sequencing (Sanger/NGS), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in-situ hybridization (ISH). mCRC metastases to liver, brain, ovary or lung (n = 1507) showed differential expression of markers including high protein expression of TOPO1 (52%) and/or low RRM1 (57%), TS (71%) and MGMT (39%), suggesting possible benefit from irinotecan, gemcitabine, 5FU/capecitabine and temozolomide, respectively. Lung metastases harbored a higher Her2 protein expression than the primary colon tumors (4% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.028). Brain and lung metastases had higher KRAS mutations than other sites (65% vs 59% vs 47%, respectively, p = 0.07, <0.01), suggesting poor response to anti-EGFR therapies. BRAF-mutated CRC (n = 455) showed coincident high protein expression of RRM1 (56%), TS (53%) and low PDGFR (22%) as compared with BRAF wild-type tumors. KRAS-mutated mCRC had higher protein expression of c-MET (47% vs. 36%) and lower MGMT (56% vs. 63%), suggesting consideration of c-MET inhibitors and temozolomide. KRAS-mutated CRC had high TUBB3 (42% vs. 33%) and low Her2 by IHC (0.5%) and HER2 by FISH (3%, p <0.05). CRC primaries had a lower incidence of PIK3CA and BRAF mutations in rectal cancer versus colon cancer (10% and 3.3%, respectively). MP of 6892 CRCs identified significant differences between primary and metastatic sites and among BRAF/KRAS sub-types. Our findings are hypothesis generating and need to be examined in prospective studies. Specific therapies may be considered for different actionable targets in mCRC as revealed by MP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1726-1737
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Biology and Therapy
Volume16
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2015

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Colorectal Neoplasms
temozolomide
irinotecan
gemcitabine
Neoplasm Metastasis
Lung
Colonic Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Proteins
Therapeutics
Immunohistochemistry
Mutation
Biological Science Disciplines
Brain
Rectal Neoplasms
Fluorouracil
In Situ Hybridization
Ovary
Colon
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Oncology
  • Pharmacology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

El-Deiry, Wafik S. ; Vijayvergia, Namrata ; Xiu, Joanne ; Scicchitano, Angelique ; Lim, Bora ; Yee, Nelson S. ; Harvey, Harold A. ; Gatalica, Zoran ; Reddy, Sandeep. / Molecular profiling of 6,892 colorectal cancer samples suggests different possible treatment options specific to metastatic sites. In: Cancer Biology and Therapy. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 12. pp. 1726-1737.
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abstract = "Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis with an overall 5-year survival of 13.1{\%}. Therapies guided by tumor profiling have suggested benefit in advanced cancer. We used a multiplatform molecular profiling (MP) approach to identify key molecular changes that may provide therapeutic options not typically considered in mCRC. We evaluated 6892 mCRC referred to Caris Life Sciences by MP including sequencing (Sanger/NGS), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in-situ hybridization (ISH). mCRC metastases to liver, brain, ovary or lung (n = 1507) showed differential expression of markers including high protein expression of TOPO1 (52{\%}) and/or low RRM1 (57{\%}), TS (71{\%}) and MGMT (39{\%}), suggesting possible benefit from irinotecan, gemcitabine, 5FU/capecitabine and temozolomide, respectively. Lung metastases harbored a higher Her2 protein expression than the primary colon tumors (4{\%} vs. 1.8{\%}, p = 0.028). Brain and lung metastases had higher KRAS mutations than other sites (65{\%} vs 59{\%} vs 47{\%}, respectively, p = 0.07, <0.01), suggesting poor response to anti-EGFR therapies. BRAF-mutated CRC (n = 455) showed coincident high protein expression of RRM1 (56{\%}), TS (53{\%}) and low PDGFR (22{\%}) as compared with BRAF wild-type tumors. KRAS-mutated mCRC had higher protein expression of c-MET (47{\%} vs. 36{\%}) and lower MGMT (56{\%} vs. 63{\%}), suggesting consideration of c-MET inhibitors and temozolomide. KRAS-mutated CRC had high TUBB3 (42{\%} vs. 33{\%}) and low Her2 by IHC (0.5{\%}) and HER2 by FISH (3{\%}, p <0.05). CRC primaries had a lower incidence of PIK3CA and BRAF mutations in rectal cancer versus colon cancer (10{\%} and 3.3{\%}, respectively). MP of 6892 CRCs identified significant differences between primary and metastatic sites and among BRAF/KRAS sub-types. Our findings are hypothesis generating and need to be examined in prospective studies. Specific therapies may be considered for different actionable targets in mCRC as revealed by MP.",
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Molecular profiling of 6,892 colorectal cancer samples suggests different possible treatment options specific to metastatic sites. / El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Xiu, Joanne; Scicchitano, Angelique; Lim, Bora; Yee, Nelson S.; Harvey, Harold A.; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep.

In: Cancer Biology and Therapy, Vol. 16, No. 12, 02.12.2015, p. 1726-1737.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Molecular profiling of 6,892 colorectal cancer samples suggests different possible treatment options specific to metastatic sites

AU - El-Deiry, Wafik S.

AU - Vijayvergia, Namrata

AU - Xiu, Joanne

AU - Scicchitano, Angelique

AU - Lim, Bora

AU - Yee, Nelson S.

AU - Harvey, Harold A.

AU - Gatalica, Zoran

AU - Reddy, Sandeep

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N2 - Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis with an overall 5-year survival of 13.1%. Therapies guided by tumor profiling have suggested benefit in advanced cancer. We used a multiplatform molecular profiling (MP) approach to identify key molecular changes that may provide therapeutic options not typically considered in mCRC. We evaluated 6892 mCRC referred to Caris Life Sciences by MP including sequencing (Sanger/NGS), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in-situ hybridization (ISH). mCRC metastases to liver, brain, ovary or lung (n = 1507) showed differential expression of markers including high protein expression of TOPO1 (52%) and/or low RRM1 (57%), TS (71%) and MGMT (39%), suggesting possible benefit from irinotecan, gemcitabine, 5FU/capecitabine and temozolomide, respectively. Lung metastases harbored a higher Her2 protein expression than the primary colon tumors (4% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.028). Brain and lung metastases had higher KRAS mutations than other sites (65% vs 59% vs 47%, respectively, p = 0.07, <0.01), suggesting poor response to anti-EGFR therapies. BRAF-mutated CRC (n = 455) showed coincident high protein expression of RRM1 (56%), TS (53%) and low PDGFR (22%) as compared with BRAF wild-type tumors. KRAS-mutated mCRC had higher protein expression of c-MET (47% vs. 36%) and lower MGMT (56% vs. 63%), suggesting consideration of c-MET inhibitors and temozolomide. KRAS-mutated CRC had high TUBB3 (42% vs. 33%) and low Her2 by IHC (0.5%) and HER2 by FISH (3%, p <0.05). CRC primaries had a lower incidence of PIK3CA and BRAF mutations in rectal cancer versus colon cancer (10% and 3.3%, respectively). MP of 6892 CRCs identified significant differences between primary and metastatic sites and among BRAF/KRAS sub-types. Our findings are hypothesis generating and need to be examined in prospective studies. Specific therapies may be considered for different actionable targets in mCRC as revealed by MP.

AB - Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) carries a poor prognosis with an overall 5-year survival of 13.1%. Therapies guided by tumor profiling have suggested benefit in advanced cancer. We used a multiplatform molecular profiling (MP) approach to identify key molecular changes that may provide therapeutic options not typically considered in mCRC. We evaluated 6892 mCRC referred to Caris Life Sciences by MP including sequencing (Sanger/NGS), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in-situ hybridization (ISH). mCRC metastases to liver, brain, ovary or lung (n = 1507) showed differential expression of markers including high protein expression of TOPO1 (52%) and/or low RRM1 (57%), TS (71%) and MGMT (39%), suggesting possible benefit from irinotecan, gemcitabine, 5FU/capecitabine and temozolomide, respectively. Lung metastases harbored a higher Her2 protein expression than the primary colon tumors (4% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.028). Brain and lung metastases had higher KRAS mutations than other sites (65% vs 59% vs 47%, respectively, p = 0.07, <0.01), suggesting poor response to anti-EGFR therapies. BRAF-mutated CRC (n = 455) showed coincident high protein expression of RRM1 (56%), TS (53%) and low PDGFR (22%) as compared with BRAF wild-type tumors. KRAS-mutated mCRC had higher protein expression of c-MET (47% vs. 36%) and lower MGMT (56% vs. 63%), suggesting consideration of c-MET inhibitors and temozolomide. KRAS-mutated CRC had high TUBB3 (42% vs. 33%) and low Her2 by IHC (0.5%) and HER2 by FISH (3%, p <0.05). CRC primaries had a lower incidence of PIK3CA and BRAF mutations in rectal cancer versus colon cancer (10% and 3.3%, respectively). MP of 6892 CRCs identified significant differences between primary and metastatic sites and among BRAF/KRAS sub-types. Our findings are hypothesis generating and need to be examined in prospective studies. Specific therapies may be considered for different actionable targets in mCRC as revealed by MP.

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