Molecular surveillance for lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the eastern United States

Jesse M. Thomas, Andrew B. Allison, Edward C. Holmes, Jamie E. Phillips, Elizabeth M. Bunting, Michael J. Yabsley, Justin David Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0122644
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2015

Fingerprint

Gammaherpesvirinae
Eastern United States
Viruses
viruses
monitoring
bone marrow
Retroviridae
Bone
Bone Marrow
Meleagris gallopavo
DNA viruses
Tissue
Birds
Virus Diseases
Israel
Liver
spleen
Cluster Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Thomas, J. M., Allison, A. B., Holmes, E. C., Phillips, J. E., Bunting, E. M., Yabsley, M. J., & Brown, J. D. (2015). Molecular surveillance for lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the eastern United States. PloS one, 10(4), [e0122644]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122644
Thomas, Jesse M. ; Allison, Andrew B. ; Holmes, Edward C. ; Phillips, Jamie E. ; Bunting, Elizabeth M. ; Yabsley, Michael J. ; Brown, Justin David. / Molecular surveillance for lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the eastern United States. In: PloS one. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 4.
@article{c70164e4ec054aadb4585bfd1fb28714,
title = "Molecular surveillance for lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the eastern United States",
abstract = "Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47{\%}) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83{\%}. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.",
author = "Thomas, {Jesse M.} and Allison, {Andrew B.} and Holmes, {Edward C.} and Phillips, {Jamie E.} and Bunting, {Elizabeth M.} and Yabsley, {Michael J.} and Brown, {Justin David}",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0122644",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "4",

}

Thomas, JM, Allison, AB, Holmes, EC, Phillips, JE, Bunting, EM, Yabsley, MJ & Brown, JD 2015, 'Molecular surveillance for lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the eastern United States', PloS one, vol. 10, no. 4, e0122644. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122644

Molecular surveillance for lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the eastern United States. / Thomas, Jesse M.; Allison, Andrew B.; Holmes, Edward C.; Phillips, Jamie E.; Bunting, Elizabeth M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Justin David.

In: PloS one, Vol. 10, No. 4, e0122644, 21.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Molecular surveillance for lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the eastern United States

AU - Thomas, Jesse M.

AU - Allison, Andrew B.

AU - Holmes, Edward C.

AU - Phillips, Jamie E.

AU - Bunting, Elizabeth M.

AU - Yabsley, Michael J.

AU - Brown, Justin David

PY - 2015/4/21

Y1 - 2015/4/21

N2 - Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.

AB - Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928542384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928542384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0122644

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0122644

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

M1 - e0122644

ER -