Monitoring surfaces on the molecular level during catalytic reactions at high pressure by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy

Paul S. Cremer, B. J. McIntyre, M. Salmeron, Y. R. Shen, G. A. Somorjai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sum frequency generation (SFG), using non-linear laser optics, detects vibrational spectra of submonolayer amounts of adsorbates with excellent energy and time resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM) is sensitive to the atomic surface structure; readily imaging defects, steps and kinks as well as stationary adsorbed species. Both of these techniques can be used during reactions at high pressures and temperatures to obtain molecular information in situ. We report studies of propylene hydrogenation over Pt(111) crystal surfaces at atmospheric pressures and 300 K using SFG and STM. Four surface species (2-propyl, π-bonded propylene, di σ-bonded propylene, and propylidyne) were identified; the first two being implicated as reaction intermediates. The platinum surface structure remains unchanged during the reaction, consistent with the structure insensitive nature of olefin hydrogénation. Propylene decomposition induced substantial surface reconstruction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-18
Number of pages8
JournalCatalysis Letters
Volume34
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1995

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Vibrational spectroscopy
Scanning tunneling microscopy
Propylene
Monitoring
Surface structure
Laser optics
Reaction intermediates
Surface reconstruction
Alkenes
Vibrational spectra
Adsorbates
Platinum
Olefins
Atmospheric pressure
Hydrogenation
Spectroscopy
Decomposition
Scanning
Imaging techniques
Defects

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

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Monitoring surfaces on the molecular level during catalytic reactions at high pressure by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. / Cremer, Paul S.; McIntyre, B. J.; Salmeron, M.; Shen, Y. R.; Somorjai, G. A.

In: Catalysis Letters, Vol. 34, No. 1-2, 01.03.1995, p. 11-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Monitoring surfaces on the molecular level during catalytic reactions at high pressure by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy

AU - Cremer, Paul S.

AU - McIntyre, B. J.

AU - Salmeron, M.

AU - Shen, Y. R.

AU - Somorjai, G. A.

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AB - Sum frequency generation (SFG), using non-linear laser optics, detects vibrational spectra of submonolayer amounts of adsorbates with excellent energy and time resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM) is sensitive to the atomic surface structure; readily imaging defects, steps and kinks as well as stationary adsorbed species. Both of these techniques can be used during reactions at high pressures and temperatures to obtain molecular information in situ. We report studies of propylene hydrogenation over Pt(111) crystal surfaces at atmospheric pressures and 300 K using SFG and STM. Four surface species (2-propyl, π-bonded propylene, di σ-bonded propylene, and propylidyne) were identified; the first two being implicated as reaction intermediates. The platinum surface structure remains unchanged during the reaction, consistent with the structure insensitive nature of olefin hydrogénation. Propylene decomposition induced substantial surface reconstruction.

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