Monocrystalline perovskite wafers/thin films for photovoltaic and transistor applications

Kai Wang, Congcong Wu, Yuchen Hou, Dong Yang, Shashank Priya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

High-purity monocrystalline silicon has a long history in the development of photovoltaics; so far, it has dominant applications in modern computers with its profound implementations in transistors and chips. The success of silicon has shown that monocrystalline wafers/thin films of semiconducting materials with superior electronic properties are a good platform for optoelectronic and electronic applications. Recently, the newly emerging semiconducting materials of halide perovskites (HPs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their continuing success in high-efficiency solar cells. The demonstrated optoelectronic properties of HPs indicate that it could be a promising alternative to the silicon-based semiconducting industry. However, the prerequisite of high-efficiency devices is the material accessibility of monocrystalline HPs (mono-HPs), as per the lessons learned from monocrystalline silicon. Current HPs-based technologies, in terms of research areas such as solar cells, photodetectors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, and transistors, suffer a bottleneck in manufacturing mono-HP wafers/thin-film materials; hence, exciting results involving mono-HP devices are absent. State-of-the-art optoelectronic HP-based devices are exclusively built using polycrystalline thin films, which are limited in their performance due to issues such as grain-boundary defects, large trap density, and inhomogeneous charge transport. However, these issues can be resolved by utilizing mono-HPs. In this review, we provide in-depth analyses and discussions on the potential of mono-HPs in photovoltaics and transistor applications, and we present the remaining challenges, as well as promising research strategies, to provide a direction for future programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24661-24690
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry A
Volume7
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Perovskite
Transistors
Optoelectronic devices
Monocrystalline silicon
Thin films
Silicon
Solar cells
Photodetectors
Electronic properties
Light emitting diodes
Semiconductor lasers
Charge transfer
Grain boundaries
Defects
perovskite
Industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

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title = "Monocrystalline perovskite wafers/thin films for photovoltaic and transistor applications",
abstract = "High-purity monocrystalline silicon has a long history in the development of photovoltaics; so far, it has dominant applications in modern computers with its profound implementations in transistors and chips. The success of silicon has shown that monocrystalline wafers/thin films of semiconducting materials with superior electronic properties are a good platform for optoelectronic and electronic applications. Recently, the newly emerging semiconducting materials of halide perovskites (HPs) have attracted considerable attention owing to their continuing success in high-efficiency solar cells. The demonstrated optoelectronic properties of HPs indicate that it could be a promising alternative to the silicon-based semiconducting industry. However, the prerequisite of high-efficiency devices is the material accessibility of monocrystalline HPs (mono-HPs), as per the lessons learned from monocrystalline silicon. Current HPs-based technologies, in terms of research areas such as solar cells, photodetectors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, and transistors, suffer a bottleneck in manufacturing mono-HP wafers/thin-film materials; hence, exciting results involving mono-HP devices are absent. State-of-the-art optoelectronic HP-based devices are exclusively built using polycrystalline thin films, which are limited in their performance due to issues such as grain-boundary defects, large trap density, and inhomogeneous charge transport. However, these issues can be resolved by utilizing mono-HPs. In this review, we provide in-depth analyses and discussions on the potential of mono-HPs in photovoltaics and transistor applications, and we present the remaining challenges, as well as promising research strategies, to provide a direction for future programs.",
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Monocrystalline perovskite wafers/thin films for photovoltaic and transistor applications. / Wang, Kai; Wu, Congcong; Hou, Yuchen; Yang, Dong; Priya, Shashank.

In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Vol. 7, No. 43, 01.01.2019, p. 24661-24690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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