Mood, Dimensional Personality, and Suicidality in a Longitudinal Sample of Patients with Bipolar Disorder and Controls

Masoud Kamali, Erika F.H. Saunders, Shervin Assari, Kelly A. Ryan, David F. Marshall, Melvin G. McInnis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effects of mood and anxiety symptoms in relation to personality dimensions and clinical features such as trauma and substance use on suicidal behaviors in a longitudinal sample of individuals with bipolar illness (BP) and healthy controls (HC). Methods: Mood, personality, and clinical features were assessed in 151 individuals with BP I and 119 HC. Clinical data were collected at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. Personality traits were measured using the NEO PI-R. Results: In bivariate analyses, personality measures were significantly different between BP and HC, and between BP based on suicide attempt history. However, in regression analyses, baseline measures of depression, mania, anxiety, trauma, education, and age of BP onset correlated with personality domains, while a history of suicide attempts did not. Logistic regressions showed that prospective depression or mania, and a pattern of mixed mood features and chronicity of illness, along with two Neuroticism facet scores (N4—Self-Consciousness and N6—Vulnerability) were predictive of suicide ideation (SI) in the 2-year follow-up period. Conclusions: While dimensions of personality, trauma, and substance use clearly correlated with suicidal behaviors in BP, in multivariate models emerging mood symptoms were the most robust predictors of suicidality. These results reinforce the importance and attributable role of mood and anxiety symptoms in evaluating suicidal risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1360-1378
Number of pages19
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

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Bipolar Disorder
Personality
Suicide
Anxiety
Wounds and Injuries
Depression
Consciousness
Logistic Models
History
Regression Analysis
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kamali, Masoud ; Saunders, Erika F.H. ; Assari, Shervin ; Ryan, Kelly A. ; Marshall, David F. ; McInnis, Melvin G. / Mood, Dimensional Personality, and Suicidality in a Longitudinal Sample of Patients with Bipolar Disorder and Controls. In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. 2019 ; Vol. 49, No. 5. pp. 1360-1378.
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Mood, Dimensional Personality, and Suicidality in a Longitudinal Sample of Patients with Bipolar Disorder and Controls. / Kamali, Masoud; Saunders, Erika F.H.; Assari, Shervin; Ryan, Kelly A.; Marshall, David F.; McInnis, Melvin G.

In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, Vol. 49, No. 5, 01.10.2019, p. 1360-1378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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