Moral deliberation and operative rights: A response to Mary Magada-Ward and Cynthia Gayman

Vincent Colapietro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this article is to show how intimately connected Beth J. Singer's theory of operative rights is with her understanding of the deliberative process. I thus argue against Cynthia Gayman's effort to set in contrast Singer's theory of rights and Dewey's characteristic emphasis on reflective morality. Since I take the value of Singer's approach to be most evident in its relevance to the abortion debate as an ongoing deliberation, I question whether Mary Magada-Ward sufficiently appreciates the dialogical and deliberative emphases of Singer's stance. My goal, however, is not so much to argue against either Gayman or Magada-Ward as it is to argue for taking Singer's position even more seriously than either author does. In particular, I want to highlight the finely nuanced character of Singer's philosophical intervention in the debate regarding abortion, especially stressing certain features that Gayman and Magada-Ward overlook.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)440-455
Number of pages16
JournalMetaphilosophy
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Philosophy

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