More than culture

Structural racism, intersectionality theory, and immigrant health

Edna A. Viruell-Fuentes, Patricia Y. Miranda, Sawsan Abdulrahim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

314 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Explanations for immigrant health outcomes often invoke culture through the use of the concept of acculturation. The over reliance on cultural explanations for immigrant health outcomes has been the topic of growing debate, with the critics' main concern being that such explanations obscure the impact of structural factors on immigrant health disparities. In this paper, we highlight the shortcomings of cultural explanations as currently employed in the health literature, and argue for a shift from individual culture-based frameworks, to perspectives that address how multiple dimensions of inequality intersect to impact health outcomes. Based on our review of the literature, we suggest specific lines of inquiry regarding immigrants' experiences with day-to-day discrimination, as well as on the roles that place and immigration policies play in shaping immigrant health outcomes. The paper concludes with suggestions for integrating intersectionality theory in future research on immigrant health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2099-2106
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume75
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Racism
intersectionality
racism
immigrant
Health
health
Acculturation
Emigration and Immigration
immigration policy
acculturation
Intersectionality
Immigrants
critic
discrimination

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Viruell-Fuentes, Edna A. ; Miranda, Patricia Y. ; Abdulrahim, Sawsan. / More than culture : Structural racism, intersectionality theory, and immigrant health. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 75, No. 12. pp. 2099-2106.
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More than culture : Structural racism, intersectionality theory, and immigrant health. / Viruell-Fuentes, Edna A.; Miranda, Patricia Y.; Abdulrahim, Sawsan.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 75, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 2099-2106.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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