Morphine-induced antinociception and reward in “humanized” mice expressing the mu opioid receptor A118G polymorphism

Angela N. Henderson-Redmond, Matthew B. Yuill, Tammy E. Lowe, Aaron M. Kline, Michael L. Zee, Josée Guindon, Daniel J. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rewarding and antinociceptive effects of opioids are mediated through the mu-opioid receptor. The A118G single nucleotide polymorphism in this receptor has been implicated in drug addiction and differences in pain response. Clinical and preclinical studies have found that the G allele is associated with increased heroin reward and self-administration, elevated post-operative pain, and reduced analgesic responsiveness to opioids. Male and female mice homozygous for the “humanized” 118AA or 118GG alleles were evaluated to test the hypothesis that 118GG mice are less sensitive to the rewarding and antinociceptive effects of morphine. We found that 118AA and 118GG mice of both genders developed conditioned place preference for morphine. All mice developed tolerance to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of morphine. However, morphine tolerance was not different between AA and GG mice. We also examined sensitivity to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of cumulative morphine doses. We found that 118GG mice show reduced hypothermic and antinociceptive responses on the hotplate for 10 mg/kg morphine. Finally, we examined basal pain response and morphine-induced antinociception in the formalin test for inflammatory pain. We found no gender or genotype differences in either basal pain response or morphine-induced antinociception in the formalin test. Our data suggests that homozygous expression of the GG allele in mice blunts morphine-induced hypothermia and hotplate antinociception but does not alter morphine CPP, morphine tolerance, or basal inflammatory pain response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-12
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume123
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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mu Opioid Receptor
Reward
Morphine
Pain
Alleles
Pain Measurement
Opioid Analgesics
Induced Hypothermia
Self Administration
Heroin
Substance-Related Disorders
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Analgesics
Genotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Henderson-Redmond, Angela N. ; Yuill, Matthew B. ; Lowe, Tammy E. ; Kline, Aaron M. ; Zee, Michael L. ; Guindon, Josée ; Morgan, Daniel J. / Morphine-induced antinociception and reward in “humanized” mice expressing the mu opioid receptor A118G polymorphism. In: Brain Research Bulletin. 2016 ; Vol. 123. pp. 5-12.
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Morphine-induced antinociception and reward in “humanized” mice expressing the mu opioid receptor A118G polymorphism. / Henderson-Redmond, Angela N.; Yuill, Matthew B.; Lowe, Tammy E.; Kline, Aaron M.; Zee, Michael L.; Guindon, Josée; Morgan, Daniel J.

In: Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 123, 01.05.2016, p. 5-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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