Most of the Response Elicited against Wolbachia Surface Protein in Filarial Nematode Infection Is Due to the Infective Larval Stage

Tracey J. Lamb, Laetitia Le Goff, Agnes Kurniawan, David B. Guiliano, Katelyn Fenn, Mark L. Blaxter, Andrew Fraser Read, Judith E. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immune responses to the intracellular Wolbachia bacteria of filarial nematodes are thought to contribute to the pathologic process of filarial infection. Here, we compare antibody responses of subjects living in an area where lymphatic filariasis is endemic with antibody responses elicited in a murine model of filarial infection, to provide evidence that the infective larval stage (L3), not adult nematodes, are the primary inducer of responses against Wolbachia. In human subjects, antibody responses to Brugia malayi Wolbachia surface protein (WSP) are most often correlated with antibody responses to the L3 stage of B. malayi. Analysis of anti-WSP responses induced in mice by different stages of the rodent filariae Litomosoides sigmodontis shows that the strongest anti-WSP response is elicited by the L3 stage. Although adult filarial nematode death may play a role in the generation of an anti-WSP response, it is the L3 stage that is the major source of immunogenic material, and incoming L3 provide a continual boosting of the anti-WSP response. Significant exposure to the endosymbiotic bacteria may occur earlier in nematode infection than previously thought, and the level of exposure to infective insect bites may be a key determinant of disease progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-127
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume189
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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Wolbachia
Nematode Infections
Membrane Proteins
Antibody Formation
Brugia malayi
Filarioidea
Insect Bites and Stings
Filarial Elephantiasis
Bacteria
Pathologic Processes
Infection
Disease Progression
Rodentia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Lamb, T. J., Le Goff, L., Kurniawan, A., Guiliano, D. B., Fenn, K., Blaxter, M. L., ... Allen, J. E. (2004). Most of the Response Elicited against Wolbachia Surface Protein in Filarial Nematode Infection Is Due to the Infective Larval Stage. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 189(1), 120-127. https://doi.org/10.1086/380490
Lamb, Tracey J. ; Le Goff, Laetitia ; Kurniawan, Agnes ; Guiliano, David B. ; Fenn, Katelyn ; Blaxter, Mark L. ; Read, Andrew Fraser ; Allen, Judith E. / Most of the Response Elicited against Wolbachia Surface Protein in Filarial Nematode Infection Is Due to the Infective Larval Stage. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 189, No. 1. pp. 120-127.
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abstract = "Immune responses to the intracellular Wolbachia bacteria of filarial nematodes are thought to contribute to the pathologic process of filarial infection. Here, we compare antibody responses of subjects living in an area where lymphatic filariasis is endemic with antibody responses elicited in a murine model of filarial infection, to provide evidence that the infective larval stage (L3), not adult nematodes, are the primary inducer of responses against Wolbachia. In human subjects, antibody responses to Brugia malayi Wolbachia surface protein (WSP) are most often correlated with antibody responses to the L3 stage of B. malayi. Analysis of anti-WSP responses induced in mice by different stages of the rodent filariae Litomosoides sigmodontis shows that the strongest anti-WSP response is elicited by the L3 stage. Although adult filarial nematode death may play a role in the generation of an anti-WSP response, it is the L3 stage that is the major source of immunogenic material, and incoming L3 provide a continual boosting of the anti-WSP response. Significant exposure to the endosymbiotic bacteria may occur earlier in nematode infection than previously thought, and the level of exposure to infective insect bites may be a key determinant of disease progression.",
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Most of the Response Elicited against Wolbachia Surface Protein in Filarial Nematode Infection Is Due to the Infective Larval Stage. / Lamb, Tracey J.; Le Goff, Laetitia; Kurniawan, Agnes; Guiliano, David B.; Fenn, Katelyn; Blaxter, Mark L.; Read, Andrew Fraser; Allen, Judith E.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 189, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 120-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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