Mothering: Thinking is part of the job description: Application of cognitive views to understanding maladaptive parenting and doing intervention and prevention work

Sandra T. Azar, Elizabeth B. Reitz, Megan C. Goslin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Irving Sigel's work, particularly his two volumes and numerous papers on parental beliefs, has left a strong mark on theoretical developmental work, applied research, and clinical research and practice. This article focuses on the impact that a cognitive perspective on parenting has had on our understanding of maladaptive parenting and practice. Cognitive views provide a unique approach for developing theory, conducting science, and formulating and carrying out interventions and policy in parenting. The use of cognitive science paradigms has enhanced our understanding of crucial mechanisms in parental responses, as well as helped us to guard against decontextualizing the maternal role from the larger picture of adult females' lives. This article presents examples of cognitive constructs that have been linked to parenting and to child risk. Ways in which a cognitive approach has enhanced parenting intervention and prevention efforts are also described. Finally, future directions for work in these areas are outlined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-304
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

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Job Application
Job Description
Parenting
Cognitive Science
Research
Mothers
Thinking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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