Motif profile dynamics and transient species in a Boolean model of mutualistic ecological communities

Colin Campbell, Katriona Shea, Suann Yang, Reka Z. Albert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Network motifs are generally studied to characterize the local interaction patterns of networks. Here, we apply the concept of a motif profile to a synchronous Boolean network model of the formation of mutualistic ecological communities, focusing on four-node subgraphs.We consider the process by which networks dynamically progress from a random initial condition to an attractor (steady state or limit cycle, collectively viewed in this context as a stable community). While the subgraphs are not classified as motifs in the usual sense of the term, we show that subgraphs with predominantly stabilizing (i.e. beneficial for species persistence) interactions are generally composed of species that are present in the attractor. The converse also holds: subgraphs with predominantly destabilizing (i.e. detrimental for species persistence) interactions are more commonly composed of species that are present in the community only transiently. We discuss our findings in the context of mutualistic ecological networks, and argue that the dynamic motif profile may provide a valuable analytical tool in other networks representing complex dynamic systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-139
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Complex Networks
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 22 2014

Fingerprint

Boolean Model
Complex networks
Ecosystems
Dynamical systems
Subgraph
Persistence
Attractor
Boolean Networks
Local Interaction
Complex Dynamics
Interaction
Converse
Limit Cycle
Network Model
Dynamic Systems
Complex Systems
Initial conditions
Profile
Community
Term

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Control and Optimization
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

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abstract = "Network motifs are generally studied to characterize the local interaction patterns of networks. Here, we apply the concept of a motif profile to a synchronous Boolean network model of the formation of mutualistic ecological communities, focusing on four-node subgraphs.We consider the process by which networks dynamically progress from a random initial condition to an attractor (steady state or limit cycle, collectively viewed in this context as a stable community). While the subgraphs are not classified as motifs in the usual sense of the term, we show that subgraphs with predominantly stabilizing (i.e. beneficial for species persistence) interactions are generally composed of species that are present in the attractor. The converse also holds: subgraphs with predominantly destabilizing (i.e. detrimental for species persistence) interactions are more commonly composed of species that are present in the community only transiently. We discuss our findings in the context of mutualistic ecological networks, and argue that the dynamic motif profile may provide a valuable analytical tool in other networks representing complex dynamic systems.",
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Motif profile dynamics and transient species in a Boolean model of mutualistic ecological communities. / Campbell, Colin; Shea, Katriona; Yang, Suann; Albert, Reka Z.

In: Journal of Complex Networks, Vol. 4, No. 1, 22.09.2014, p. 127-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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