Motivations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy as a function of socioeconomic status

Dadrie F. Baptiste, Erina L. MacGeorge, Maria K. Venetis, Ashton Mouton, L. Brooke Friley, Rebekah Pastor, Kristen Hatten, Janaka Lagoo, Susan E. Clare, Monet W. Bowling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite no demonstrated survival advantage for women at average risk of breast cancer, rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) continue to increase. Research reveals women with higher socioeconomic status (SES) are more likely to select CPM. This study examines how indicators of SES, age, and disease severity affect CPM motivations. Methods: Patients (N = 113) who underwent CPM at four Indiana University affiliated hospitals completed telephone interviews in 2013. Participants answered questions about 11 CPM motivations and provided demographic information. Responses to motivation items were factor analyzed, resulting in 4 motivational factors: reducing long-term risk, symmetry, avoiding future medical visits, and avoiding treatments. Results: Across demographic differences, reducing long-term risk was the strongest CPM motivation. Lower income predicted stronger motivation to reduce long-term risk and avoid treatment. Older participants were more motivated to avoid treatment; younger and more-educated patients were more concerned about symmetry. Greater severity of diagnosis predicted avoiding treatments. Conclusions: Reducing long-term risk is the primary motivation across groups, but there are also notable differences as a function of age, education, income, and disease severity. To stop the trend of increasing CPM, physicians must tailor patient counseling to address motivations that are consistent across patient populations and those that vary between populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number10
JournalBMC Women's Health
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Social Class
Motivation
Demography
Therapeutics
Prophylactic Mastectomy
Population
Counseling
Interviews
Breast Neoplasms
Physicians
Education
Survival
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Baptiste, D. F., MacGeorge, E. L., Venetis, M. K., Mouton, A., Friley, L. B., Pastor, R., ... Bowling, M. W. (2017). Motivations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy as a function of socioeconomic status. BMC Women's Health, 17(1), [10]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-017-0366-2
Baptiste, Dadrie F. ; MacGeorge, Erina L. ; Venetis, Maria K. ; Mouton, Ashton ; Friley, L. Brooke ; Pastor, Rebekah ; Hatten, Kristen ; Lagoo, Janaka ; Clare, Susan E. ; Bowling, Monet W. / Motivations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy as a function of socioeconomic status. In: BMC Women's Health. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 1.
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Baptiste, DF, MacGeorge, EL, Venetis, MK, Mouton, A, Friley, LB, Pastor, R, Hatten, K, Lagoo, J, Clare, SE & Bowling, MW 2017, 'Motivations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy as a function of socioeconomic status', BMC Women's Health, vol. 17, no. 1, 10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-017-0366-2

Motivations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy as a function of socioeconomic status. / Baptiste, Dadrie F.; MacGeorge, Erina L.; Venetis, Maria K.; Mouton, Ashton; Friley, L. Brooke; Pastor, Rebekah; Hatten, Kristen; Lagoo, Janaka; Clare, Susan E.; Bowling, Monet W.

In: BMC Women's Health, Vol. 17, No. 1, 10, 01.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Motivations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy as a function of socioeconomic status

AU - Baptiste, Dadrie F.

AU - MacGeorge, Erina L.

AU - Venetis, Maria K.

AU - Mouton, Ashton

AU - Friley, L. Brooke

AU - Pastor, Rebekah

AU - Hatten, Kristen

AU - Lagoo, Janaka

AU - Clare, Susan E.

AU - Bowling, Monet W.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Background: Despite no demonstrated survival advantage for women at average risk of breast cancer, rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) continue to increase. Research reveals women with higher socioeconomic status (SES) are more likely to select CPM. This study examines how indicators of SES, age, and disease severity affect CPM motivations. Methods: Patients (N = 113) who underwent CPM at four Indiana University affiliated hospitals completed telephone interviews in 2013. Participants answered questions about 11 CPM motivations and provided demographic information. Responses to motivation items were factor analyzed, resulting in 4 motivational factors: reducing long-term risk, symmetry, avoiding future medical visits, and avoiding treatments. Results: Across demographic differences, reducing long-term risk was the strongest CPM motivation. Lower income predicted stronger motivation to reduce long-term risk and avoid treatment. Older participants were more motivated to avoid treatment; younger and more-educated patients were more concerned about symmetry. Greater severity of diagnosis predicted avoiding treatments. Conclusions: Reducing long-term risk is the primary motivation across groups, but there are also notable differences as a function of age, education, income, and disease severity. To stop the trend of increasing CPM, physicians must tailor patient counseling to address motivations that are consistent across patient populations and those that vary between populations.

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