Moxalactam: Evaluation of Clinical Bleeding in Patients With Abdominal Infection

Raymond J. Joehl, Dennis A. Rasbach, James Ballard, Michael R. Weitekamp, Fred R. Sattler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Previous clinical studies have emphasized that hypoprothrombinemia may occur during treatment with moxalactam disodium, a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin. Usually, this abnormality is corrected by administering vitamin K. Recent case reports have described bleeding complications associated with moxalactam therapy and suggested that platelet function is depressed by this drug. We studied eight patients with abdominal infection who were treated with moxalactam. Six of them had prolonged template bleeding times, and two had clinically significant hemorrhage (epistaxis, hematuria, and rectal bleeding) during treatment with moxalactam. These observations suggest that coagulation studies and template bleeding times should be monitored during moxalactam therapy, especially before major surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1259-1261
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume118
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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Moxalactam
Hemorrhage
Infection
Bleeding Time
Hypoprothrombinemias
Epistaxis
Vitamin K
Hematuria
Cephalosporins
Therapeutics
Blood Platelets
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Joehl, R. J., Rasbach, D. A., Ballard, J., Weitekamp, M. R., & Sattler, F. R. (1983). Moxalactam: Evaluation of Clinical Bleeding in Patients With Abdominal Infection. Archives of Surgery, 118(11), 1259-1261. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.1983.01390110017004
Joehl, Raymond J. ; Rasbach, Dennis A. ; Ballard, James ; Weitekamp, Michael R. ; Sattler, Fred R. / Moxalactam : Evaluation of Clinical Bleeding in Patients With Abdominal Infection. In: Archives of Surgery. 1983 ; Vol. 118, No. 11. pp. 1259-1261.
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Joehl, RJ, Rasbach, DA, Ballard, J, Weitekamp, MR & Sattler, FR 1983, 'Moxalactam: Evaluation of Clinical Bleeding in Patients With Abdominal Infection', Archives of Surgery, vol. 118, no. 11, pp. 1259-1261. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.1983.01390110017004

Moxalactam : Evaluation of Clinical Bleeding in Patients With Abdominal Infection. / Joehl, Raymond J.; Rasbach, Dennis A.; Ballard, James; Weitekamp, Michael R.; Sattler, Fred R.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 118, No. 11, 01.01.1983, p. 1259-1261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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