Multigenerational nicotine exposure affects offspring nicotine metabolism, nicotine-induced hypothermia, and basal corticosterone in a sex-dependent manner

Dana Zeid, Lisa R. Goldberg, Laurel R. Seemiller, Sean Mooney-Leber, Philip B. Smith, Thomas J. Gould

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Parental nicotine exposure can impact phenotypes in unexposed offspring. Our laboratory recently published data showing that nicotine reward and hippocampal gene expression involved in stress pathways were perturbed in F1 offspring of male C57BL/6J mice chronically exposed to nicotine. For the current study, we aimed to further test nicotine and stress-sensitivity phenotypes that may predict vulnerability to nicotine addiction in new cohorts of F1 offspring derived from nicotine-exposed males. We tested locomotor and body temperature sensitivity to acute nicotine administration, serum concentration of nicotine and nicotine metabolites after acute nicotine dosing, and serum corticosterone levels in male and female F1 offspring of nicotine- or saline-exposed males. Paternal nicotine exposure reduced sensitivity to nicotine-induced hypothermia in males, altered nicotine metabolite concentrations in males and females, and reduced serum basal corticosterone levels in females. These findings may point to reduced susceptibility to nicotine addiction-related phenotypes as a result of parental nicotine exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106972
JournalNeurotoxicology and Teratology
Volume85
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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