Muscle test comparisons of congruent and incongruent self-referential statements

Daniel A. Monti, John Sinnott, Marc Marchese, Elisabeth Kunkel, Jeffrey M. Greeson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated differences in values of manual muscle tests after exposure to congruent and incongruent semantic stimuli. Muscle testing with a computerized dynamometer was performed on the deltoid muscle group of 89 healthy college students after repetitions of congruent (true) and incongruent (false) self-referential statements. The order in which statements were repeated was controlled by a counterbalanced design. The combined data showed that approximately 17% more total force over a 59% longer period of time could be endured when subjects repeated semantically congruent statements (p < .001). Order effects were not significant. Over-all, significant differences were found in muscle-test responses between congruent and incongruent semantic stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1019-1028
Number of pages10
JournalPerceptual and Motor Skills
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Semantics
Muscles
Deltoid Muscle
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Monti, Daniel A. ; Sinnott, John ; Marchese, Marc ; Kunkel, Elisabeth ; Greeson, Jeffrey M. / Muscle test comparisons of congruent and incongruent self-referential statements. In: Perceptual and Motor Skills. 1999 ; Vol. 88, No. 3. pp. 1019-1028.
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Muscle test comparisons of congruent and incongruent self-referential statements. / Monti, Daniel A.; Sinnott, John; Marchese, Marc; Kunkel, Elisabeth; Greeson, Jeffrey M.

In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 88, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 1019-1028.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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