N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea induced brain tumors in rats monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, plasma proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscopy

Sigmund E. Lasker, Michael J. Iatropoulos, Stephen S. Hecht, Bijaya Misra, Shantu Amin, Edith Zang, Gary M. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Characteristic slow growing brain gliomas were induced in rats by a single subcutaneous injection of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) within 24 h of birth. A parallel control group of rats was injected with saline. Seven treated rats developed gliomas within 2 years. Periodic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 3-mm slices at 1.5 Tesla and monthly plasma sampling for proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 360 MHz were started 6 months after the injection of ENU. In the MRS experiments, the Fossel index, average of the line widths of the methylene and methyl peaks at 360 MHz, was determined from half-line widths of methyl and methylene peaks at 0.8 ppm and 1.3 ppm. In five of the ENU injected animals that developed histologically verified brain tumors, these were also observed by MRI without contrast agents. There was no consistent correlation between the imaged tumors and the Fossel index obtained through MRS during the course of the study where repeated observations were performed on individual animals, nor was there any consistent statistical difference in the Fossel index between ENU-treated and control animals. The results of this study demonstrate that slowly developing carcinogen-induced brain tumors in rats can be successfully and reliably monitored non-invasively by MRI but not by MRS of plasma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Letters
Volume67
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 24 1992

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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