Naltrexone, relapse prevention, and supportive therapy with alcoholics: An analysis of patient treatment matching

Adam J. Jaffe, Bruce Rounsaville, Richard S. Schottenfeld, Grace Chang, Roger E. Meyer, Stephanie S. O'Malley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

131 Scopus citations

Abstract

Alcohol-dependent patients (N = 97) were randomly assigned to receive either naltrexone or placebo and either relapse prevention therapy or supportive therapy. The present report explored the hypothesis that patients could be matched to the above treatments on the basis of specific pretreatment characteristics. Treatment matching variables explored included craving, alcohol dependence severity, and cognitive measures of learning and memory. Results of linear regression analyses tentatively suggest that patients experiencing higher levels of craving and poorer cognitive functioning may derive the greatest benefit from naltrexone versus placebo. For psychotherapy, lower levels of verbal learning were associated with poorer drinking outcomes for relapse prevention therapy but not for supportive therapy. Conversely, higher levels of verbal learning were associated with better outcomes for relapse prevention therapy but not for supportive therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1053
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1996

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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