Nano-tribology of a polytetrafluoroethylene transfer films using molecular dynamics simulation and microtribometry

Inkook Jang, Pamela L. Dickrell, David L. Burris, W. Gregory Sawyer, Simon R. Phillpot, Susan B. Sinnott

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine the effect of chain configuration on the frictional behavior of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) at the molecular level and compared to microtribological studies on aligned transfer films of PTFE. The average friction coefficient was substantially lower (μ < 0.04) for the duration of the experiment. Low friction coefficients (μ < 0.10) were seen for PTFE under slow speed contacts in open air; friction coefficients under MPa of contact pressure and meter per second sliding speed were typically closer to μ = 0.2. The simulation results were obtained from a well-contacted nanoscale region, which made it difficult to make a direct comparison to microscale and macroscale tribological measurements. The dynamics of the transfer films during sliding were responsible for the frictional behavior. Different morphological configurations and the addition of small oligomeric molecules were both expected to show different deformation behavior and frictional coefficients. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the World Tribology Congress III (Washington, DC 9/12-16/2005).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the World Tribology Congress III - WTC 2005
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 World Tribology Congress III - Washington, D.C., United States
Duration: Sep 12 2005Sep 16 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the World Tribology Congress III - WTC 2005

Other

Other2005 World Tribology Congress III
CountryUnited States
CityWashington, D.C.
Period9/12/059/16/05

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy(all)

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