NanoCell Electronic Memories

James M. Tour, Long Cheng, David P. Nackashi, Yuxing Yao, Austen K. Flatt, Sarah K. St. Angelo, Thomas E. Mallouk, Paul D. Franzon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

NanoCells are disordered arrays of metallic islands that are interlinked with molecules between micrometer-sized metallic input/output leads. In the past, simulations had been conducted showing that the NanoCells may function as both memory and logic devices that are programmable postfabrication. Reported here is the first assembly of a NanoCell with disordered arrays of molecules and Au islands. The assembled NanoCells exhibit reproducible switching behavior and two types of memory effects at room temperature. The switch-type memory is characteristic of a destructive read, while the conductivity-type memory features a nondestructive read. Both types of memory effects are stable for more than a week at room temperature, and bit level ratios (0:1) of the conductivity-type memory have been observed to be as high as 104:1 and reaching 106:1 upon ozone treatment, which likely destroys extraneous leakage pathways. Both molecular electronic and nanofilamentary metal switching mechanisms have been considered, though the evidence points more strongly toward the latter. The approach here demonstrates the efficacy of a disordered nanoscale array for high-yielding switching and memory while mitigating the arduous task of nanoscale patterning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13279-13283
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume125
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 2003

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Data storage equipment
Islands
Molecular electronics
Logic devices
Molecules
Temperature
Ozone
Metals
Switches
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Tour, J. M., Cheng, L., Nackashi, D. P., Yao, Y., Flatt, A. K., St. Angelo, S. K., ... Franzon, P. D. (2003). NanoCell Electronic Memories. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 125(43), 13279-13283. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja036369g
Tour, James M. ; Cheng, Long ; Nackashi, David P. ; Yao, Yuxing ; Flatt, Austen K. ; St. Angelo, Sarah K. ; Mallouk, Thomas E. ; Franzon, Paul D. / NanoCell Electronic Memories. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2003 ; Vol. 125, No. 43. pp. 13279-13283.
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Tour, JM, Cheng, L, Nackashi, DP, Yao, Y, Flatt, AK, St. Angelo, SK, Mallouk, TE & Franzon, PD 2003, 'NanoCell Electronic Memories', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 125, no. 43, pp. 13279-13283. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja036369g

NanoCell Electronic Memories. / Tour, James M.; Cheng, Long; Nackashi, David P.; Yao, Yuxing; Flatt, Austen K.; St. Angelo, Sarah K.; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Franzon, Paul D.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 125, No. 43, 29.10.2003, p. 13279-13283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Tour JM, Cheng L, Nackashi DP, Yao Y, Flatt AK, St. Angelo SK et al. NanoCell Electronic Memories. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2003 Oct 29;125(43):13279-13283. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja036369g