Nasal congestion secondary to allergic rhinitis as a cause of sleep disturbance and daytime fatigue and the response to topical nasal corticosteroids

Timothy J. Craig, Stephanie Teets, Erik B. Lehman, Vernon M. Chinchilli, Clifford Zwillich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

241 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a frequent disease affecting up to 20% of the population. AR causes a hypersensitivity reaction, which results in inflamed nasal mucosa and nasal congestion. Negative pressure generated during inspiration in the nasal airway secondary to nasal congestion may lead to nasal collapse, airway obstruction, and an increased number of sleep microarousals. Sleep disturbances and microarousals can detrimentally affect daytime energy levels, mood, and daytime function. It is unknown whether treatment directed to reduce congestion may reduce these microarousals, sleep problems, and, consequently, associated daytime fatigue. Objective: We sought to determine whether reducing nasal congestion with nasal steroids will reduce sleep complaints and daytime sleepiness. Method: We enrolled 20 subjects in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study using Balaam's Design. Patients were treated with topical nasal corticosteroids or placebo. Subjective data were collected by use of a daily diary, which focused on nasal symptoms, sleep, and daytime sleepiness. Results: The results demonstrated that nasal congestion and subjective sleep improved significantly in the topical corticosteroid-treated subjects but not in the placebo group. Sleepiness improved, but not significantly (p = 0.08). Conclusion: Often, people with perennial allergies may attribute their daytime fatigue to causes such as the side effects of medications, when in fact, the fatigue may be a result of nasal congestion and associated sleep fragmentation. Decreasing nasal congestion with nasal steroids may improve sleep, daytime fatigue, and the quality of life of patients with AR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-637
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume101
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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