Nationwide Healthcare Expenditures among Hypertensive Individuals with Stroke: 2003-2014

Alain Zingraff Lekoubou Looti, Kinfe G. Bishu, Bruce Ovbiagele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Of all the various clinical entities, hypertension is arguably most strongly linked to the occurrence of stroke. However, the impact of stroke on health-care expenditures in patients with hypertension has not been previously evaluated. Methods: We analyzed data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component, 2003-2014 data. Adults aged 18 years or greater were included in this analysis. We used a 2-part model (adjusting for demographic, comorbidity, and time) to estimate the incremental health-care expenditures incurred by stroke among individuals with hypertension. Results: On average, $4057 more dollars (adjusted incremental health-care expenditure) was spent on individuals with hypertension plus stroke versus no history of stroke. Overall unadjusted mean medical expenditure in those with a comorbid diagnosis of stroke was twice as high as in those without a diagnosis of stroke ($16,668 versus 8374; P <.001). Inpatient expenditures (37.4%), outpatient expenditures, and prescription expenditures (nearly 23% each) accounted for almost 80% of the total mean unadjusted direct expenditures. Annual average unadjusted aggregate costs among individuals with hypertension and stroke were $98.3 billion, while annual adjusted aggregate incremental costs were higher by $24 billion among patients with stroke versus those without stroke. Conclusion: Among individuals with hypertension in the United States, those who have experienced a stroke incur tens of billions of dollars in higher health-care expenditures compared with those without known stroke. Greater emphasis on stroke prevention strategies and cost control initiatives (wherever appropriate) are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1760-1769
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Health Expenditures
Stroke
Delivery of Health Care
Hypertension
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cost Control
Prescriptions
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Outpatients
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Nationwide Healthcare Expenditures among Hypertensive Individuals with Stroke: 2003-2014",
abstract = "Background: Of all the various clinical entities, hypertension is arguably most strongly linked to the occurrence of stroke. However, the impact of stroke on health-care expenditures in patients with hypertension has not been previously evaluated. Methods: We analyzed data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component, 2003-2014 data. Adults aged 18 years or greater were included in this analysis. We used a 2-part model (adjusting for demographic, comorbidity, and time) to estimate the incremental health-care expenditures incurred by stroke among individuals with hypertension. Results: On average, $4057 more dollars (adjusted incremental health-care expenditure) was spent on individuals with hypertension plus stroke versus no history of stroke. Overall unadjusted mean medical expenditure in those with a comorbid diagnosis of stroke was twice as high as in those without a diagnosis of stroke ($16,668 versus 8374; P <.001). Inpatient expenditures (37.4{\%}), outpatient expenditures, and prescription expenditures (nearly 23{\%} each) accounted for almost 80{\%} of the total mean unadjusted direct expenditures. Annual average unadjusted aggregate costs among individuals with hypertension and stroke were $98.3 billion, while annual adjusted aggregate incremental costs were higher by $24 billion among patients with stroke versus those without stroke. Conclusion: Among individuals with hypertension in the United States, those who have experienced a stroke incur tens of billions of dollars in higher health-care expenditures compared with those without known stroke. Greater emphasis on stroke prevention strategies and cost control initiatives (wherever appropriate) are warranted.",
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Nationwide Healthcare Expenditures among Hypertensive Individuals with Stroke : 2003-2014. / Lekoubou Looti, Alain Zingraff; Bishu, Kinfe G.; Ovbiagele, Bruce.

In: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 27, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 1760-1769.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Nationwide Healthcare Expenditures among Hypertensive Individuals with Stroke

T2 - 2003-2014

AU - Lekoubou Looti, Alain Zingraff

AU - Bishu, Kinfe G.

AU - Ovbiagele, Bruce

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