"naturally" less exciting? Visual production of men's and women's track and field coverage during the 2004 Olympics

Jennifer D. Greer, Marie Hardin, Casey Homan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study analyzes visual production techniques in NBC's 2004 Olympic track and field coverage using Zettl's applied media aesthetics approach. Track and field coverage is worthy of analysis in relation to gender because of the sport's perception as gender-neutral in comparison to other sports such as gymnastics (feminine), or U.S. football (masculine). Men's coverage was presented as more visually exciting than women'sit used more shot types, camera angles, and motion special effects per minute. These differences may contribute to perceptions that women's sports are inferior or naturally less interesting than men's, reinforcing men as the symbolic authority in sport.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-189
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

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Sports
coverage
Special effects
gender
aesthetics
Cameras

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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"naturally" less exciting? Visual production of men's and women's track and field coverage during the 2004 Olympics. / Greer, Jennifer D.; Hardin, Marie; Homan, Casey.

In: Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Vol. 53, No. 2, 01.04.2009, p. 173-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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