Near-surface in situ stress. 2. A comparison with stress directions inferred from earthquakes, joints, and topography near Blue Mountain Lake, New York.

R. Plumb, James Terry Engelder, M. Sbar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At 11 outcrops within 100 km of Blue Mountain Lake, New York, we measured strain relaxation during overcoring of 'surface', 'doorstopper', and Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauges. To confirm further the orientation of in situ stress, at two sites, vertical fractures were induced at borehole walls using a packer-fracturing technique. Several cores from each site were then tested for mechanical anisotropy using ultrasonic, compressibility, and thin section analyses. The orientations of mechanical anisotropy had a poor correlation with the preferred orientation of microcracks observed in thin section. The various techniques for measuring in situ stress orientations gave internally consistent results were epsilon1 generally aligned with topographic contours and often the mechanically stiff direction of the core. We interpret the alignment of epsilon1 and other structures to be the result of a feedback between the contemporary tectonic stress and the process of jointing during the development of local topography. Hence epsilon1 is controlled by local structures and is a reflection of the contemporary tectonic stress but not a direct measure of it. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9333-9349
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume89
Issue numberB11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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in situ stress
tectonics
earthquakes
lakes
mountains
Topography
topography
Lakes
Earthquakes
thin section
earthquake
compressibility
mountain
lake
anisotropy
Tectonics
borehole
boreholes
gauges
Boreholes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

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title = "Near-surface in situ stress. 2. A comparison with stress directions inferred from earthquakes, joints, and topography near Blue Mountain Lake, New York.",
abstract = "At 11 outcrops within 100 km of Blue Mountain Lake, New York, we measured strain relaxation during overcoring of 'surface', 'doorstopper', and Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauges. To confirm further the orientation of in situ stress, at two sites, vertical fractures were induced at borehole walls using a packer-fracturing technique. Several cores from each site were then tested for mechanical anisotropy using ultrasonic, compressibility, and thin section analyses. The orientations of mechanical anisotropy had a poor correlation with the preferred orientation of microcracks observed in thin section. The various techniques for measuring in situ stress orientations gave internally consistent results were epsilon1 generally aligned with topographic contours and often the mechanically stiff direction of the core. We interpret the alignment of epsilon1 and other structures to be the result of a feedback between the contemporary tectonic stress and the process of jointing during the development of local topography. Hence epsilon1 is controlled by local structures and is a reflection of the contemporary tectonic stress but not a direct measure of it. -from Authors",
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Near-surface in situ stress. 2. A comparison with stress directions inferred from earthquakes, joints, and topography near Blue Mountain Lake, New York. / Plumb, R.; Engelder, James Terry; Sbar, M.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 89, No. B11, 01.01.1984, p. 9333-9349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Near-surface in situ stress. 2. A comparison with stress directions inferred from earthquakes, joints, and topography near Blue Mountain Lake, New York.

AU - Plumb, R.

AU - Engelder, James Terry

AU - Sbar, M.

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N2 - At 11 outcrops within 100 km of Blue Mountain Lake, New York, we measured strain relaxation during overcoring of 'surface', 'doorstopper', and Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauges. To confirm further the orientation of in situ stress, at two sites, vertical fractures were induced at borehole walls using a packer-fracturing technique. Several cores from each site were then tested for mechanical anisotropy using ultrasonic, compressibility, and thin section analyses. The orientations of mechanical anisotropy had a poor correlation with the preferred orientation of microcracks observed in thin section. The various techniques for measuring in situ stress orientations gave internally consistent results were epsilon1 generally aligned with topographic contours and often the mechanically stiff direction of the core. We interpret the alignment of epsilon1 and other structures to be the result of a feedback between the contemporary tectonic stress and the process of jointing during the development of local topography. Hence epsilon1 is controlled by local structures and is a reflection of the contemporary tectonic stress but not a direct measure of it. -from Authors

AB - At 11 outcrops within 100 km of Blue Mountain Lake, New York, we measured strain relaxation during overcoring of 'surface', 'doorstopper', and Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauges. To confirm further the orientation of in situ stress, at two sites, vertical fractures were induced at borehole walls using a packer-fracturing technique. Several cores from each site were then tested for mechanical anisotropy using ultrasonic, compressibility, and thin section analyses. The orientations of mechanical anisotropy had a poor correlation with the preferred orientation of microcracks observed in thin section. The various techniques for measuring in situ stress orientations gave internally consistent results were epsilon1 generally aligned with topographic contours and often the mechanically stiff direction of the core. We interpret the alignment of epsilon1 and other structures to be the result of a feedback between the contemporary tectonic stress and the process of jointing during the development of local topography. Hence epsilon1 is controlled by local structures and is a reflection of the contemporary tectonic stress but not a direct measure of it. -from Authors

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