Needle cutting of skin simulants

Andrew C. Barnett, Lei Tan, Jessica Barrett, Jason Z. Moore

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Tissue simulants are commonly used in medical procedure training and research to test the insertion and cutting mechanics of medical devices. Accurate representation of the forces and tissue properties is important for the efficacy of the training and research studies. This paper provides a quantitative method of determining the performance of tissue simulants. A force model was used to determine the three component forces: tearing, spreading, and friction forces, of a needle passing through six different skin simulants. Experiments were performed to determine the fracture toughness, shear modulus, friction between the simulant and needle, and the crack length in the simulant made by the needle. Polyurethane with Shore hardness 40 A was shown to be the best simulant by having the composition of forces most similar to porcine skin tissue: 39% and 61% for the tearing force, 18% and 32% for the spreading force, and 29% and 21% for the friction force for the polyurethane and porcine skin respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaterials; Biomanufacturing; Properties, Applications and Systems; Sustainable Manufacturing
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
ISBN (Electronic)9780791849903
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
EventASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016 - Blacksburg, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2016Jul 1 2016

Publication series

NameASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016
Volume2

Other

OtherASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016
CountryUnited States
CityBlacksburg
Period6/27/167/1/16

Fingerprint

Needles
Skin
Tissue
Friction
Polyurethanes
Fracture toughness
Mechanics
Elastic moduli
Hardness
Cracks
Chemical analysis
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Barnett, A. C., Tan, L., Barrett, J., & Moore, J. Z. (2016). Needle cutting of skin simulants. In Materials; Biomanufacturing; Properties, Applications and Systems; Sustainable Manufacturing (ASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016; Vol. 2). American Society of Mechanical Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1115/MSEC2016-8690
Barnett, Andrew C. ; Tan, Lei ; Barrett, Jessica ; Moore, Jason Z. / Needle cutting of skin simulants. Materials; Biomanufacturing; Properties, Applications and Systems; Sustainable Manufacturing. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2016. (ASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016).
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Barnett, AC, Tan, L, Barrett, J & Moore, JZ 2016, Needle cutting of skin simulants. in Materials; Biomanufacturing; Properties, Applications and Systems; Sustainable Manufacturing. ASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016, vol. 2, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016, Blacksburg, United States, 6/27/16. https://doi.org/10.1115/MSEC2016-8690

Needle cutting of skin simulants. / Barnett, Andrew C.; Tan, Lei; Barrett, Jessica; Moore, Jason Z.

Materials; Biomanufacturing; Properties, Applications and Systems; Sustainable Manufacturing. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2016. (ASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Barnett AC, Tan L, Barrett J, Moore JZ. Needle cutting of skin simulants. In Materials; Biomanufacturing; Properties, Applications and Systems; Sustainable Manufacturing. American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 2016. (ASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016). https://doi.org/10.1115/MSEC2016-8690