Neighborhood disadvantage and the nature of violence

Eric P. Baumer, Julie Horney, Richard B. Felson, Janet L. Lauritsen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although numerous studies have examined the influence of neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage on the quantity of violence, little attention has been devoted to whether such conditions also shape the quality of violence. Drawing on Anderson's (1999) influential ethnography, we derive several hypotheses about how the nature of violence differs across neighborhoods with varying socioeconomic conditions. Using data on assaults and robberies from the area-identified National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), our analyses reveal support for Anderson's description of the nature of violence in different neighborhood contexts, but only mixed support for his argument that those differences are due to neighborhood effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-71
Number of pages33
JournalCriminology
Volume41
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

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Violence
violence
Cultural Anthropology
Crime Victims
Crime
assault
victimization
ethnography
offense

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

Baumer, Eric P. ; Horney, Julie ; Felson, Richard B. ; Lauritsen, Janet L. / Neighborhood disadvantage and the nature of violence. In: Criminology. 2003 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 39-71.
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Baumer, EP, Horney, J, Felson, RB & Lauritsen, JL 2003, 'Neighborhood disadvantage and the nature of violence', Criminology, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 39-71.

Neighborhood disadvantage and the nature of violence. / Baumer, Eric P.; Horney, Julie; Felson, Richard B.; Lauritsen, Janet L.

In: Criminology, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.02.2003, p. 39-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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