Neighborhood effects on the efficacy of a program to prevent youth alcohol use

Scott Yabiku, Stephen Kulis, Flavio Francisco Marsiglia, Ben Lewin, Tanya Nieri, Syed Hussaini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines how neighborhood characteristics affect program efficacy. Data come from a randomized trial of a substance use prevention program called keepin' it REAL, which was administered to a predominantly Mexican American sample of 4,622 middle school students in Phoenix, Arizona, beginning in 1998. Multilevel models and multiple imputation techniques address clustered data and attrition. Among less linguistically acculturated Latinos, living in poorer neighborhoods and those with many single-mother families decreased program effectiveness in combating alcohol use. High neighborhood immigrant composition increased program effectiveness. Unexpectedly, the program was also more effective in neighborhoods with higher rates of crime. There were no significant effects on program efficacy for the more linguistically acculturated Latinos and non-Hispanic White students. Findings are discussed in light of theories of neighborhood social disorganization, immigrant adaptation, and social isolation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-87
Number of pages23
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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