Neighborhood isolation in Chicago: Violent crime effects on structural isolation and homophily in inter-neighborhood commuting networks

Corina Graif, Alina Lungeanu, Alyssa M. Yetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urban sociologists and criminologists have long been interested in the link between neighborhood isolation and crime. Yet studies have focused predominantly on the internal dimension of social isolation (i.e., increased social disorganization and insufficient jobs and opportunities). This study highlights the need to assess the external dimension of neighborhood isolation, the disconnectedness from other neighborhoods in the city. Analyses of Chicago's neighborhood commuting network over twelve years (2002–2013) showed that violence predicted network isolation. Moreover, pairwise similarity in neighborhood violence predicted commuting ties, supporting homophily expectations. Violence homophily affected tie formation most, while neighborhood violence was important in dissolving ties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-59
Number of pages20
JournalSocial Networks
Volume51
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

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violent crime
Crime
social isolation
Violence
violence
Anomie
Social Isolation
sociologist
offense

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Anthropology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Neighborhood isolation in Chicago : Violent crime effects on structural isolation and homophily in inter-neighborhood commuting networks. / Graif, Corina; Lungeanu, Alina; Yetter, Alyssa M.

In: Social Networks, Vol. 51, 10.2017, p. 40-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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