Neighborhood racial context and perceptions of police-based racial discrimination among black youth

Eric A. Stewart, Eric P. Baumer, Rod K. Brunson, Ronald L. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Renewed interest has occurred in the United States around racially biased policing. Unfortunately, little is known about the effects of neighborhood social context on black adolescents' experiences with racially biased policing. In the current study, we examined whether perceptions of racially biased policing against black adolescents are a function of neighborhood racial composition, net of other neighborhood- and individual-level factors. Using two waves of data from 763 black adolescents, we found that black adolescents most frequently are discriminated against by the police in predominantly white neighborhoods. This effect especially is pronounced in white neighborhoods that experienced recent growth in the size of the black population. Our results lend support to the "defended" white neighborhood thesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-887
Number of pages41
JournalCriminology
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

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Racism
Police
racism
police
adolescent
Population Density
Growth
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

Stewart, Eric A. ; Baumer, Eric P. ; Brunson, Rod K. ; Simons, Ronald L. / Neighborhood racial context and perceptions of police-based racial discrimination among black youth. In: Criminology. 2009 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 847-887.
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Neighborhood racial context and perceptions of police-based racial discrimination among black youth. / Stewart, Eric A.; Baumer, Eric P.; Brunson, Rod K.; Simons, Ronald L.

In: Criminology, Vol. 47, No. 3, 01.08.2009, p. 847-887.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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