Neighborhood structural characteristics and mental disorder: Faris and Dunham revisited

Eric Silver, Edward P. Mulvey, Jeffrey W. Swanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

271 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the relationship between neighborhood structural characteristics and mental disorder using data from the National Institute of Mental Health's Epidemiological Catchment (ECA) surveys (n=11,686). After controlling for individual-level characteristics, we found that neighborhood disadvantage was associated with higher rates of major depression and substance abuse disorder, and that neighborhood residential mobility was associated with higher rates of schizophrenia, major depression, and substance abuse disorder. Implications for future research on the social ecology of mental disorder are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1457-1470
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume55
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

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mental disorder
Mental Disorders
substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
Depression
National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.)
social ecology
Social Environment
Population Dynamics
schizophrenia
Schizophrenia
mental health
Substance Abuse
Ecology
Mental Health
Residential Mobility
Catchment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Silver, Eric ; Mulvey, Edward P. ; Swanson, Jeffrey W. / Neighborhood structural characteristics and mental disorder : Faris and Dunham revisited. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 55, No. 8. pp. 1457-1470.
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Neighborhood structural characteristics and mental disorder : Faris and Dunham revisited. / Silver, Eric; Mulvey, Edward P.; Swanson, Jeffrey W.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 8, 01.10.2002, p. 1457-1470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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