Neighborhoods and self-control: Toward an expanded view of socialization

Brent Teasdale, Eric Silver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article we develop and test a multi-level theory of the sources of self-control among adolescents. We argue that neighborhoods are an important structural source of self-control. We test this idea using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 9,171). Results from a multilevel structural equation model indicate that neighborhood disadvantage is a significant predictor of adolescent self-control, controlling for demographics, family characteristics, and social integration. Implications for future research on the role of neighborhood context in the development of self-control among youth are discussed. In addition, we discuss the implications for policy of multilevel theorizing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-222
Number of pages18
JournalSocial Problems
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 9 2009

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self-control
socialization
adolescent
social integration
structural model
longitudinal study
health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Neighborhoods and self-control : Toward an expanded view of socialization. / Teasdale, Brent; Silver, Eric.

In: Social Problems, Vol. 56, No. 1, 09.02.2009, p. 205-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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