Neonicotinoid seed treatments of soybean provide negligible benefits to US farmers

Spyridon Mourtzinis, Christian H. Krupke, Paul D. Esker, Adam Varenhorst, Nicholas J. Arneson, Carl A. Bradley, Adam M. Byrne, Martin I. Chilvers, Loren J. Giesler, Ames Herbert, Yuba R. Kandel, Maciej J. Kazula, Catherine Hunt, Laura E. Lindsey, Sean Malone, Daren S. Mueller, Seth Naeve, Emerson Nafziger, Dominic D. Reisig, William J. RossDevon R. Rossman, Sally Taylor, Shawn P. Conley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neonicotinoids are the most widely used insecticides worldwide and are typically deployed as seed treatments (hereafter NST) in many grain and oilseed crops, including soybeans. However, there is a surprising dearth of information regarding NST effectiveness in increasing soybean seed yield, and most published data suggest weak, or inconsistent yield benefit. The US is the key soybean-producing nation worldwide and this work includes soybean yield data from 194 randomized and replicated field studies conducted specifically to evaluate the effect of NSTs on soybean seed yield at sites within 14 states from 2006 through 2017. Here we show that across the principal soybean-growing region of the country, there are negligible and management-specific yield benefits attributed to NSTs. Across the entire region, the maximum observed yield benefits due to fungicide (FST = fungicide seed treatment) + neonicotinoid use (FST + NST) reached 0.13 Mg/ha. Across the entire region, combinations of management practices affected the effectiveness of FST + NST to increase yield but benefits were minimal ranging between 0.01 to 0.22 Mg/ha. Despite widespread use, this practice appears to have little benefit for most of soybean producers; across the entire region, a partial economic analysis further showed inconsistent evidence of a break-even cost of FST or FST + NST. These results demonstrate that the current widespread prophylactic use of NST in the key soybean-producing areas of the US should be re-evaluated by producers and regulators alike.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number11207
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

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Soybeans
Seeds
Therapeutics
Farmers
Practice Management
Insecticides
Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Mourtzinis, S., Krupke, C. H., Esker, P. D., Varenhorst, A., Arneson, N. J., Bradley, C. A., ... Conley, S. P. (2019). Neonicotinoid seed treatments of soybean provide negligible benefits to US farmers. Scientific reports, 9(1), [11207]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47442-8
Mourtzinis, Spyridon ; Krupke, Christian H. ; Esker, Paul D. ; Varenhorst, Adam ; Arneson, Nicholas J. ; Bradley, Carl A. ; Byrne, Adam M. ; Chilvers, Martin I. ; Giesler, Loren J. ; Herbert, Ames ; Kandel, Yuba R. ; Kazula, Maciej J. ; Hunt, Catherine ; Lindsey, Laura E. ; Malone, Sean ; Mueller, Daren S. ; Naeve, Seth ; Nafziger, Emerson ; Reisig, Dominic D. ; Ross, William J. ; Rossman, Devon R. ; Taylor, Sally ; Conley, Shawn P. / Neonicotinoid seed treatments of soybean provide negligible benefits to US farmers. In: Scientific reports. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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Mourtzinis, S, Krupke, CH, Esker, PD, Varenhorst, A, Arneson, NJ, Bradley, CA, Byrne, AM, Chilvers, MI, Giesler, LJ, Herbert, A, Kandel, YR, Kazula, MJ, Hunt, C, Lindsey, LE, Malone, S, Mueller, DS, Naeve, S, Nafziger, E, Reisig, DD, Ross, WJ, Rossman, DR, Taylor, S & Conley, SP 2019, 'Neonicotinoid seed treatments of soybean provide negligible benefits to US farmers', Scientific reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 11207. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47442-8

Neonicotinoid seed treatments of soybean provide negligible benefits to US farmers. / Mourtzinis, Spyridon; Krupke, Christian H.; Esker, Paul D.; Varenhorst, Adam; Arneson, Nicholas J.; Bradley, Carl A.; Byrne, Adam M.; Chilvers, Martin I.; Giesler, Loren J.; Herbert, Ames; Kandel, Yuba R.; Kazula, Maciej J.; Hunt, Catherine; Lindsey, Laura E.; Malone, Sean; Mueller, Daren S.; Naeve, Seth; Nafziger, Emerson; Reisig, Dominic D.; Ross, William J.; Rossman, Devon R.; Taylor, Sally; Conley, Shawn P.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 11207, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Neonicotinoid seed treatments of soybean provide negligible benefits to US farmers

AU - Mourtzinis, Spyridon

AU - Krupke, Christian H.

AU - Esker, Paul D.

AU - Varenhorst, Adam

AU - Arneson, Nicholas J.

AU - Bradley, Carl A.

AU - Byrne, Adam M.

AU - Chilvers, Martin I.

AU - Giesler, Loren J.

AU - Herbert, Ames

AU - Kandel, Yuba R.

AU - Kazula, Maciej J.

AU - Hunt, Catherine

AU - Lindsey, Laura E.

AU - Malone, Sean

AU - Mueller, Daren S.

AU - Naeve, Seth

AU - Nafziger, Emerson

AU - Reisig, Dominic D.

AU - Ross, William J.

AU - Rossman, Devon R.

AU - Taylor, Sally

AU - Conley, Shawn P.

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Neonicotinoids are the most widely used insecticides worldwide and are typically deployed as seed treatments (hereafter NST) in many grain and oilseed crops, including soybeans. However, there is a surprising dearth of information regarding NST effectiveness in increasing soybean seed yield, and most published data suggest weak, or inconsistent yield benefit. The US is the key soybean-producing nation worldwide and this work includes soybean yield data from 194 randomized and replicated field studies conducted specifically to evaluate the effect of NSTs on soybean seed yield at sites within 14 states from 2006 through 2017. Here we show that across the principal soybean-growing region of the country, there are negligible and management-specific yield benefits attributed to NSTs. Across the entire region, the maximum observed yield benefits due to fungicide (FST = fungicide seed treatment) + neonicotinoid use (FST + NST) reached 0.13 Mg/ha. Across the entire region, combinations of management practices affected the effectiveness of FST + NST to increase yield but benefits were minimal ranging between 0.01 to 0.22 Mg/ha. Despite widespread use, this practice appears to have little benefit for most of soybean producers; across the entire region, a partial economic analysis further showed inconsistent evidence of a break-even cost of FST or FST + NST. These results demonstrate that the current widespread prophylactic use of NST in the key soybean-producing areas of the US should be re-evaluated by producers and regulators alike.

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