Neuronal mechanisms mediating pathological reward-related behaviors: A focus on silent synapses in the nucleus accumbens

Dillon S. McDevitt, Nicholas Graziane

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The compulsive drive to seek drugs despite negative consequences relies heavily on drug-induced alterations that occur within the reward neurocircuit. These alterations include changes in neuromodulator and neurotransmitter systems that ultimately lock behaviors into an inflexible and permanent state. To provide clinicians with improved treatment options, researchers are trying to identify, as potential targets of therapeutic intervention, the neural mechanisms mediating an “addictive-like state”. Here, we discuss how drug-induced generation of silent synapses in the nucleus accumbens may be a potential therapeutic target capable of reversing drug-related behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-96
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacological Research
Volume136
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Nucleus Accumbens
Reward
Synapses
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neurotransmitter Agents
Research Personnel
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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Neuronal mechanisms mediating pathological reward-related behaviors : A focus on silent synapses in the nucleus accumbens. / McDevitt, Dillon S.; Graziane, Nicholas.

In: Pharmacological Research, Vol. 136, 01.10.2018, p. 90-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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