Never Let Them See You Cry: Self-Presentation as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Exclusion and Self-Esteem

Michael Jason Bernstein, Heather M. Claypool, Steven G. Young, Taylor Tuscherer, Donald F. Sacco, Christina M. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A debate exists concerning whether exclusion harms self-esteem. We hypothesized that social exclusion does harm self-esteem, but that this effect is evident only when self-presentational concerns to "appear fine" are minimal or people are unable to alter their report of self-esteem. In the first three studies, participants' explicit and implicit self-esteem were measured following an exclusion or comparison condition where self-presentational pressures were likely high. Because respondents can easily control their reports on explicit measures, but not on implicit ones, we hypothesized that exclusion would result in lower self-esteem only when implicit measures were used. Results confirmed this hypothesis. In the final study, self-presentational concerns were directly manipulated. When self-presentational concerns were high, only implicit self-esteem was lowered by exclusion. But, when such concerns were low, this impact on self-esteem was seen on implicit and explicit measures. Implications for the sociometer hypothesis and the recent self-esteem debate are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1293-1305
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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Self Concept
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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Bernstein, Michael Jason ; Claypool, Heather M. ; Young, Steven G. ; Tuscherer, Taylor ; Sacco, Donald F. ; Brown, Christina M. / Never Let Them See You Cry : Self-Presentation as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Exclusion and Self-Esteem. In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 2013 ; Vol. 39, No. 10. pp. 1293-1305.
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Never Let Them See You Cry : Self-Presentation as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Exclusion and Self-Esteem. / Bernstein, Michael Jason; Claypool, Heather M.; Young, Steven G.; Tuscherer, Taylor; Sacco, Donald F.; Brown, Christina M.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 39, No. 10, 01.10.2013, p. 1293-1305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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