New development: Public sector responses to complex socio-ecological issues—no silver bullets for rabbits

Michael J. Reid, Lauren A. Hull, Theodore R. Alter, Lisa B. Adams, Heidi M. Kleinert, Andrew P. Woolnough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article reports on a United Nations-award winning initiative, the Victoria Rabbit Action Network (VRAN), which applied a systems approach, underpinned by a democratic and participatory engagement strategy, to manage one of Australia’s worst pests: the European rabbit. Over six years of the initiative there has been a shift away from a regulation-and-enforcement focused model, towards a community-led, government-supported approach. This has enabled the collective planning, resourcing and implementation of rabbit management programmes. This article outlines the learnings and implications for policy and public management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPublic Money and Management
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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public management
UNO
public sector
regulation
planning
management
learning
community
Rabbit
Public sector

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Reid, Michael J. ; Hull, Lauren A. ; Alter, Theodore R. ; Adams, Lisa B. ; Kleinert, Heidi M. ; Woolnough, Andrew P. / New development : Public sector responses to complex socio-ecological issues—no silver bullets for rabbits. In: Public Money and Management. 2019.
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New development : Public sector responses to complex socio-ecological issues—no silver bullets for rabbits. / Reid, Michael J.; Hull, Lauren A.; Alter, Theodore R.; Adams, Lisa B.; Kleinert, Heidi M.; Woolnough, Andrew P.

In: Public Money and Management, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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