New Implications for Wildlife Loss Evaluation: The Role of Subjective Predictors

Gretchen A. Nurse, Jacob Arthur Benfield, Paul A. Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The quantification and evaluation of environmental losses has been a topic of interest for several years. Research has focused on cause of loss as a primary factor influencing loss assessment, but has neglected less objective influences. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three different conditions of cause of the wildlife loss (human, natural, ambiguous) with type of animal (mammal, bird, fish) and proximity of animal (local, international) also manipulated. Participants rated the value of each loss to themselves and society as a whole. They also rated three subjective predictors: similarity of the animal, familiarity with the animal, and ability to relate to the animal. Both subjective and objective factors affected loss assessment with cause of loss not being influential at the individual or societal level of assessment. Similarity, familiarity, and ability to relate were all significant predictors of value in at least some combinations of animal species and proximity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-99
Number of pages13
JournalHuman Dimensions of Wildlife
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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animal
familiarity
loss
evaluation
wildlife
mammal
bird
fish
animal species
society

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

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New Implications for Wildlife Loss Evaluation : The Role of Subjective Predictors. / Nurse, Gretchen A.; Benfield, Jacob Arthur; Bell, Paul A.

In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 87-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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