No Eastern and Central European left behind: A cross country regression for fertility, human capital and market economy

Mustafa Seref Akin, Valerica Vlad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1999, fertility rates in Central and Eastern European countries reached the lowest levels in the world. Using panel data, this paper analyses the sharp decline in fertility for these countries during their transition towards a market economy. It extends previous research in three ways: First, it distinguishes education by gender as a proxy for human capital. Second, in addition to GDP more economic variables are used to capture the effect of a declining standard of living, including unemployment. Finally, it tries to capture the relationship between advancement toward a new market economy and fertility. Some of the results reflect some special features of the CEE region: only tertiary education is correlated with fertility; fertility is responsive to a 'business cycle' type of macroeconomic factors, particularly, to female unemployment; and foreign direct investment (FDI) as a proxy for new market economy has a negative association with fertility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)963-974
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of International Development
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

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human capital
market economy
fertility
regression
unemployment
education
business cycle
fertility rate
standard of living
direct investment
economic factors
foreign investment
foreign direct investment
panel data
living standard
macroeconomics
Gross Domestic Product
gender
economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development

Cite this

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No Eastern and Central European left behind : A cross country regression for fertility, human capital and market economy. / Akin, Mustafa Seref; Vlad, Valerica.

In: Journal of International Development, Vol. 19, No. 7, 01.10.2007, p. 963-974.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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