No evidence for a dilution effect of the nonnative snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, on native snails

Michele D. Larson, Edward P. Levri, Snehalata V. Huzurbazar, Daniel J. Greenwood, Kara L. Wise, Amy C. Krist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The dilution effect can occur by a range of mechanisms and results in reduced parasite prevalence in host taxa. In invaded ecosystems, the dilution effect can benefit native species if non-native species, acting as resistant or less competent hosts, reduce rates of parasitic infections in native species. In field experiments, we assessed whether manipulating biomass of the non-native snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, caused a dilution effect by reducing trematode infections in three taxa of native snails. In contrast to many studies showing resistant or less competent non-native hosts can “dilute” or reduce infection rates, we found no evidence for a dilution effect reducing infection rates of any of the native snails. We suggest that a dilution effect may not have occurred because most trematode taxa are highly host specific, and thus the trematode transmission stages did not recognize the invasive snail as a possible host. In this case, community composition appears to be important in influencing the dilution effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0239762
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number10 October
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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