No league of their own baseball, black women, and the politics of representation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the experiences and representations of three black women who played baseball in the Negro Leagues in the 1950s. The article demonstrates the way the Negro League owners, the black press, and black male sportswriters used varying representations of athletic black womanhood to sell game tickets and generate business for a league in decline. Ultimately, the article argues that the recovery of the women in the 1990s romanticizes their civil rights-era athletic participation and obscures the physical and symbolic labor they performed as professional athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-96
Number of pages23
JournalRadical History Review
Volume2016
Issue number125
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2016

Fingerprint

Politics of Representation
League
Negroes
Athletics
Athletes
1950s
Womanhood
Recovery
Participation
Physical
Labor
Ticket
Civil Rights
1990s

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History

Cite this

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No league of their own baseball, black women, and the politics of representation. / Davis, Amira Rose.

In: Radical History Review, Vol. 2016, No. 125, 05.2016, p. 74-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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