Non-labile soil 15Nitrogen retention beneath three tree species in a tropical plantation

Jason Philip Kaye, Dan Binkley, Xiaoming Zou, John A. Parrotta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil organic matter is the largest sink for N additions to forests. Species composition may affect soil N retention by altering the amount or proportion of added N stored in non-labile organic pools. We measured 15N tracer retention in labile and non-labile pools of surface (0-20 cm) mineral soils, 7 yr after the tracer was applied to a 9 yr. old Puerto Rican tree plantation with replicated stands of three species (two N-fixers, one Eucalyptus, Euc). Laboratory incubations (13 mo) with repeated leaching separated total soil N into labile (inorganic N leached) and non-labile (total N minus leached N) pools, and a labile C treatment tested linkages between C availability and N retention. We hypothesized that species composition would alter the amount and proportion of recovered tracer N in non-labile organic matter. Surface soils contained 45% of the tracer, but the amount retained in labile and non-labile pools was similar among species. In contrast, the proportion of recovered tracer in non-labile pools was greater in soils beneath N-fixers (75%) than Euc (62%). Labile C additions increased the size of the non-labile tracer N pool. We conclude that tree species composition may affect long-term soil N retention by altering the proportion of N in slow-turnover, non-labile pools. Plants may also alter soil N retention by renewing labile C pools; a continuous supply of labile C increased the transfer of 15N into non-labile organic matter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-619
Number of pages8
JournalSoil Science Society of America Journal
Volume66
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 26 2002

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tracer techniques
plantation
plantations
tracer
soil
soil organic matter
species diversity
organic matter
mineral soils
Eucalyptus
leaching
turnover
soil surface
incubation
mineral

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Soil Science

Cite this

Kaye, Jason Philip ; Binkley, Dan ; Zou, Xiaoming ; Parrotta, John A. / Non-labile soil 15Nitrogen retention beneath three tree species in a tropical plantation. In: Soil Science Society of America Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 66, No. 2. pp. 612-619.
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abstract = "Soil organic matter is the largest sink for N additions to forests. Species composition may affect soil N retention by altering the amount or proportion of added N stored in non-labile organic pools. We measured 15N tracer retention in labile and non-labile pools of surface (0-20 cm) mineral soils, 7 yr after the tracer was applied to a 9 yr. old Puerto Rican tree plantation with replicated stands of three species (two N-fixers, one Eucalyptus, Euc). Laboratory incubations (13 mo) with repeated leaching separated total soil N into labile (inorganic N leached) and non-labile (total N minus leached N) pools, and a labile C treatment tested linkages between C availability and N retention. We hypothesized that species composition would alter the amount and proportion of recovered tracer N in non-labile organic matter. Surface soils contained 45{\%} of the tracer, but the amount retained in labile and non-labile pools was similar among species. In contrast, the proportion of recovered tracer in non-labile pools was greater in soils beneath N-fixers (75{\%}) than Euc (62{\%}). Labile C additions increased the size of the non-labile tracer N pool. We conclude that tree species composition may affect long-term soil N retention by altering the proportion of N in slow-turnover, non-labile pools. Plants may also alter soil N retention by renewing labile C pools; a continuous supply of labile C increased the transfer of 15N into non-labile organic matter.",
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Non-labile soil 15Nitrogen retention beneath three tree species in a tropical plantation. / Kaye, Jason Philip; Binkley, Dan; Zou, Xiaoming; Parrotta, John A.

In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, Vol. 66, No. 2, 26.03.2002, p. 612-619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Soil organic matter is the largest sink for N additions to forests. Species composition may affect soil N retention by altering the amount or proportion of added N stored in non-labile organic pools. We measured 15N tracer retention in labile and non-labile pools of surface (0-20 cm) mineral soils, 7 yr after the tracer was applied to a 9 yr. old Puerto Rican tree plantation with replicated stands of three species (two N-fixers, one Eucalyptus, Euc). Laboratory incubations (13 mo) with repeated leaching separated total soil N into labile (inorganic N leached) and non-labile (total N minus leached N) pools, and a labile C treatment tested linkages between C availability and N retention. We hypothesized that species composition would alter the amount and proportion of recovered tracer N in non-labile organic matter. Surface soils contained 45% of the tracer, but the amount retained in labile and non-labile pools was similar among species. In contrast, the proportion of recovered tracer in non-labile pools was greater in soils beneath N-fixers (75%) than Euc (62%). Labile C additions increased the size of the non-labile tracer N pool. We conclude that tree species composition may affect long-term soil N retention by altering the proportion of N in slow-turnover, non-labile pools. Plants may also alter soil N retention by renewing labile C pools; a continuous supply of labile C increased the transfer of 15N into non-labile organic matter.

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