Nonmetropolitan minority families in the United States: trends in racial and ethnic economic stratification, 1959-1986

Leif Jensen, M. Tienda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traces the economic status of nonmetropolitan black, Mexican and American Indian families during the period 1959 to 1986. Analysis of 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1987 US Census Bureau data revealed substantial improvement in the economic status of rural minority families between 1959 and 1979. However, nonmetro black and Mexican family incomes deteriorated substantially in the ensuing seven years. The shift in residence toward urban areas contributed to the 1959-1979 decline in minority poverty. Furthermore, labor market commitment has a greater ameliorative effect on family poverty for all groups than does public assistance. That poverty among nonmetro minorities improved in response to increasing labor supply is a policy-relevant finding discussed in the conclusions. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-532
Number of pages24
JournalRural Sociology
Volume54
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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minority
poverty
trend
economics
labor supply
family income
American Indian
urban area
census
labor market
assistance
commitment
Group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Nonmetropolitan minority families in the United States : trends in racial and ethnic economic stratification, 1959-1986. / Jensen, Leif; Tienda, M.

In: Rural Sociology, Vol. 54, No. 4, 01.01.1989, p. 509-532.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Traces the economic status of nonmetropolitan black, Mexican and American Indian families during the period 1959 to 1986. Analysis of 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1987 US Census Bureau data revealed substantial improvement in the economic status of rural minority families between 1959 and 1979. However, nonmetro black and Mexican family incomes deteriorated substantially in the ensuing seven years. The shift in residence toward urban areas contributed to the 1959-1979 decline in minority poverty. Furthermore, labor market commitment has a greater ameliorative effect on family poverty for all groups than does public assistance. That poverty among nonmetro minorities improved in response to increasing labor supply is a policy-relevant finding discussed in the conclusions. -from Authors

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