Nonstandard work schedules, perceived family well-being, and daily stressors

Kelly D. Davis, W. Benjamin Goodman, Amy E. Pirretti, David M. Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data from two studies assessed the effects of nonstandard work schedules on perceived family well-being and daily stressors. Study 1, using a sample of employed, married adults aged 25 - 74 (n = 1,166) from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States, showed that night work was associated with perceptions of greater marital instability, negative family-work, and work-family spillover than weekend or daytime work. In Study 2, with a subsample of adults (n = 458) who participated in the National Study of Daily Experiences, weekend workers reported more daily work stressors than weekday workers. Several sociodemographic variables were tested as moderators. Both studies demonstrated that nonstandard work schedules place a strain on working, married adults at the global and daily level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)991-1003
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

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well-being
weekend
family work
nightwork
worker
moderator
Well-being
experience
Weekend
Workers
Work Place
Night

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Davis, Kelly D. ; Benjamin Goodman, W. ; Pirretti, Amy E. ; Almeida, David M. / Nonstandard work schedules, perceived family well-being, and daily stressors. In: Journal of Marriage and Family. 2008 ; Vol. 70, No. 4. pp. 991-1003.
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Nonstandard work schedules, perceived family well-being, and daily stressors. / Davis, Kelly D.; Benjamin Goodman, W.; Pirretti, Amy E.; Almeida, David M.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 70, No. 4, 01.11.2008, p. 991-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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