Normative versus ipsative configural frequency analysis in personality research - Their use discussed in a reanalysis of data on situation-bound anxiety

Thomas Köhler, Mark Kurt Stemmler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Configurai frequency analysis (CFA) tests whether certain individual patterns in different variables are observed more frequently in a sample than expected by chance. In normative CFA, these patterns are derived from the subject's specific position in relation to sample characteristics such as the median or the mean. In ipsative CFA, patterns are defined within an individual reference system, e.g. relative to the subject's median of different variable scores. Normative CFA examines dimensionality of scales and is comparable to factor analysis in this respect. Ipsative CFA rather yields information about location of scores in different variables, in a similar way to ANOVA or Friedman testing. However, both normative and ipsative CFA may supply information not obtainable by means of the aforementioned methods. This is illustrated in a reanalysis of data in four scales of an anxiety inventory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-79
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Personality
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Normative versus ipsative configural frequency analysis in personality research - Their use discussed in a reanalysis of data on situation-bound anxiety'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this