Nosema ceranae in drone honey bees (Apis mellifera)

Brenna E. Traver, Richard D. Fell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nosema ceranae is a microsporidian intracellular parasite of honey bees, Apis mellifera. Previously Nosema apis was thought to be the only cause of nosemosis, but it has recently been proposed that N. ceranae is displacing N. apis. The rapid spread of N. ceranae could be due to additional transmission mechanisms, as well as higher infectivity. We analyzed drones for N. ceranae infections using duplex qPCR with species specific primers and probes. We found that both immature and mature drones are infected with N. ceranae at low levels. This is the first report detecting N. ceranae in immature bees. Our data suggest that because drones are known to drift from their parent hives to other hives, they could provide a means for disease spread within and between apiaries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-236
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Invertebrate Pathology
Volume107
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Fingerprint

drone honey bees
Nosema ceranae
honey
Apis mellifera
bee
disease spread
drones (insects)
infectivity
duplex
Nosema apis
parasite
probe
nosema disease
immatures
apiaries
Microsporidia
honey bees
Apoidea
pathogenicity
parasites

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

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Nosema ceranae in drone honey bees (Apis mellifera). / Traver, Brenna E.; Fell, Richard D.

In: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, Vol. 107, No. 3, 01.07.2011, p. 234-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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