Not All Perceptual Gaps Were Created Equal: Explicating the Third-Person Perception (TPP) as a Cognitive Fallacy

Lijiang Shen, Ye Sun, Zhongdang Pan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Explicating the third-person perception (TPP) as a cognitive fallacy in the process of comparative social judgment of media effects, we propose that not all self–other perceptual gaps in media effects should be considered as TPP. When there is reasonably valid and accurate information regarding self vis-à-vis others on media consumption and vulnerability to media influence, the associated self–other gaps in media effects are not exaggerations, hence, not TPP. TPP results from cognitive biases in information retrieval and application in the process of comparative social judgments. Such biases are in the forms of self-other information differential, assimilation, contrast, and anchoring effects. Caveats in interpretation of extant evidence and implications for future TPP research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-424
Number of pages26
JournalMass Communication and Society
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2018

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Information retrieval
human being
social judgement
media consumption
trend
information retrieval
assimilation
vulnerability
interpretation
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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Not All Perceptual Gaps Were Created Equal : Explicating the Third-Person Perception (TPP) as a Cognitive Fallacy. / Shen, Lijiang; Sun, Ye; Pan, Zhongdang.

In: Mass Communication and Society, Vol. 21, No. 4, 04.07.2018, p. 399-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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