Novel public-private partnerships to address the double burden of malnutrition

Adam Drewnowski, Benjamin Caballero, Jai K. Das, Jeff French, Andrew M. Prentice, Lisa R. Fries, Tessa M. Van Koperen, Petra Klassen-Wigger, Barbara Jean Rolls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Public-private partnerships are an effective way to address the global double burden of malnutrition.While public-private partnerships operate in multiple forms, their leadership usually falls to governments, public health agencies, or nongovernmental organizations, with the private sector taking a subordinate role. The rapid ascent of social media and mass communications worldwide has provided a disruptive technology for new nutrition intervention programs. A new model, provisionally called private-public engagement, takes advantage of socialmedia, massmedia, and integrated socialmarketing to reach parents, families, and communities directly. These new private-public engagement initiatives need to be managed in ways suggested for public-private partnerships by the World Health Organization, especially if the private sector is in the lead. Once the rationale for engagement is defined, there is a need to mobilize resources, establish in-country partnerships and codes of conduct, and provide a plan for monitoring, evaluation, and accountability. Provided here is an example consistent with the private-public engagement approach, ie, the United for Healthier Kids program, which has been aimed at families with children aged less than 12 years. Materials to inspire behavioral change and promote healthier diets and lifestyle were disseminated in a number of countries through both digital and physical channels, often in partnership with local or regional governments. A description of this program, along with strategies to promote transparency and communication among stakeholders, serves to provide guidance for the development of future effective private-public engagements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)805-821
Number of pages17
JournalNutrition reviews
Volume76
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Malnutrition
Private Sector
Communication
Social Media
Program Development
Social Responsibility
Public Health
Parents
Organizations
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Drewnowski, A., Caballero, B., Das, J. K., French, J., Prentice, A. M., Fries, L. R., ... Rolls, B. J. (2018). Novel public-private partnerships to address the double burden of malnutrition. Nutrition reviews, 76(11), 805-821. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuy035
Drewnowski, Adam ; Caballero, Benjamin ; Das, Jai K. ; French, Jeff ; Prentice, Andrew M. ; Fries, Lisa R. ; Van Koperen, Tessa M. ; Klassen-Wigger, Petra ; Rolls, Barbara Jean. / Novel public-private partnerships to address the double burden of malnutrition. In: Nutrition reviews. 2018 ; Vol. 76, No. 11. pp. 805-821.
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Drewnowski, A, Caballero, B, Das, JK, French, J, Prentice, AM, Fries, LR, Van Koperen, TM, Klassen-Wigger, P & Rolls, BJ 2018, 'Novel public-private partnerships to address the double burden of malnutrition', Nutrition reviews, vol. 76, no. 11, pp. 805-821. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuy035

Novel public-private partnerships to address the double burden of malnutrition. / Drewnowski, Adam; Caballero, Benjamin; Das, Jai K.; French, Jeff; Prentice, Andrew M.; Fries, Lisa R.; Van Koperen, Tessa M.; Klassen-Wigger, Petra; Rolls, Barbara Jean.

In: Nutrition reviews, Vol. 76, No. 11, 01.01.2018, p. 805-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Drewnowski A, Caballero B, Das JK, French J, Prentice AM, Fries LR et al. Novel public-private partnerships to address the double burden of malnutrition. Nutrition reviews. 2018 Jan 1;76(11):805-821. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuy035