Novel speckle-tracking radial strain from routine black-and-white echocardiographic images to quantify dyssynchrony and predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

Matthew S. Suffoletto, Kaoru Dohi, Maxime Cannesson, Samir Saba, John Gorcsan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND - Mechanical dyssynchrony is a potential means to predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). We hypothesized that novel echocardiographic image speckle tracking can quantify dyssynchrony and predict response to CRT. METHODS AND RESULTS - Seventy-four subjects were studied: 64 heart failure patients undergoing CRT (aged 64±12 years, ejection fraction 26±6%, QRS duration 157±28 ms) and 10 normal controls. Speckle tracking applied to routine midventricular short-axis images calculated radial strain from multiple circumferential points averaged to 6 standard segments. Dyssynchrony from timing of speckle-tracking peak radial strain was correlated with tissue Doppler measures in 47 subjects (r=0.94, P<0.001; 95% CI 0.90 to 0.96). The ability of baseline speckle-tracking radial dyssynchrony (time difference in peak septal wall-to-posterior wall strain ≥130 ms) to predict response to CRT was then tested. It predicted an immediate increase in stroke volume in 48 patients studied the day after CRT with 91% sensitivity and 75% specificity. In 50 patients with long-term follow-up 8±5 months after CRT, baseline speckle-tracking radial dyssynchrony predicted a significant increase in ejection fraction with 89% sensitivity and 83% specificity. Patients in whom left ventricular lead position was concordant with the site of latest mechanical activation by speckle-tracking radial strain had an increase in ejection fraction from baseline to a greater degree (10±5%) than patients with discordant lead position (6±5%; P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS - Speckle-tracking radial strain can quantify dyssynchrony and predict immediate and long-term response to CRT and has potential for clinical application.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)960-968
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume113
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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