Nuclear Power: Renaissance or Relapse? Global Climate Change and Long-Term Three Mile Island Activists' Narratives

Marci R. Culley, Holly Angelique

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Community narratives are increasingly important as people move towards an ecologically sustainable society. Global climate change is a multi-faceted problem with multiple stakeholders. The voices of affected communities must be heard as we make decisions of global significance. We document the narratives of long-term anti-nuclear activists near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant who speak out in the dawn of a nuclear renaissance/relapse. While nuclear power is marketed as a "green" solution to global warming, their narratives reveal three areas for consideration; (1) significant problems with nuclear technology, (2) lessons "not" learned from the TMI disaster, and (3) hopes for a sustainable future. Nuclear waste, untrustworthy officials and economic issues were among the problems cited. Deceptive shaping of public opinion, nuclear illiteracy, and an aging anti-nuclear movement were reasons cited for the lessons not learned. However, many remain optimistic and envision increased participation to create an ecologically-balanced world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-246
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Journal of Community Psychology
Volume45
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 16 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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