Nucleotide sequence polymorphism at the apical membrane antigen-1 locus reveals population history of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand

Chaturong Putaporntip, Somchai Jongwutiwes, Priscila Grynberg, Liwang Cui, Austin L. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Apical membrane antigen-1 is a candidate for inclusion in a vaccine for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax. We collected 231 complete sequences of the gene encoding this antigen (pvama-1) from three regions of Thailand, the most extensive collection to date of sequences at this locus. The domain II loop (previously mentioned as a potential vaccine component) was almost completely conserved, with a single amino acid variant (I313R) observed in a single sequence. The 3′ portion of the gene (domain II through the stop codon) showed significantly lower nucleotide diversity than the 5′ portion (start codon through domain I); and a given domain I sequence might be found in a haplotype with more than one domain II sequence. These results imply a hotspot of recombination between domains I and II. We found significant geographic subdivision among the three regions of Thailand (NW, East, and South) in which collections were made in 2007. Numbers of P. vivax infections have experienced overall declines since 1990 in all three regions; but the decline has been most recent in the NW, and there has been a rebound in numbers of infections in the South since 2000. Consistent with population history, amino acid sequence diversity was greatest in the NW. The South, which had by far the lowest sequence diversity of the three regions, showed signs of a population that has expanded from a small number of founders after a bottleneck.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1295-1300
Number of pages6
JournalInfection, Genetics and Evolution
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Plasmodium vivax
Thailand
antigen
polymorphism
Vaccines
genetic polymorphism
vaccines
Vivax Malaria
membrane
antigens
Antigens
nucleotide sequences
start codon
loci
Membranes
Initiator Codon
Terminator Codon
stop codon
vaccine
history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Putaporntip, Chaturong ; Jongwutiwes, Somchai ; Grynberg, Priscila ; Cui, Liwang ; Hughes, Austin L. / Nucleotide sequence polymorphism at the apical membrane antigen-1 locus reveals population history of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand. In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution. 2009 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 1295-1300.
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Nucleotide sequence polymorphism at the apical membrane antigen-1 locus reveals population history of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand. / Putaporntip, Chaturong; Jongwutiwes, Somchai; Grynberg, Priscila; Cui, Liwang; Hughes, Austin L.

In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, Vol. 9, No. 6, 01.12.2009, p. 1295-1300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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