"Numb, clumsy hands" and high cervical spondylosis

David Good, James R. Couch, Lyle Wacaser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirteen patients with cervical spondylosis and high compressive myelopathy between C-3 and C-5 presented with a distinctive clinical syndrome of "numb, clumsy hands" and stereoanesthesia of the hands. Loss of position and vibration sense was much more severe in the hands than in the legs. Relative sparing of primary sensory modalities and motor and bladder functions were other features. Most patients were incorrectly diagnosed at first and cervical myelography was the critical diagnostic test. Pathology was confirmed surgically or at autopsy. Early recognition and treatment resulted in lessened disability. The syndrome is a distinctive and unusual manifestation of high cervical myelopathy, and it has seldom been reported associated with cervical spondylosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-291
Number of pages7
JournalSurgical Neurology
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

Spondylosis
Hand
Proprioception
Myelography
Spinal Cord Compression
Spinal Cord Diseases
Vibration
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Autopsy
Leg
Urinary Bladder
Pathology
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Good, David ; Couch, James R. ; Wacaser, Lyle. / "Numb, clumsy hands" and high cervical spondylosis. In: Surgical Neurology. 1984 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 285-291.
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"Numb, clumsy hands" and high cervical spondylosis. / Good, David; Couch, James R.; Wacaser, Lyle.

In: Surgical Neurology, Vol. 22, No. 3, 01.01.1984, p. 285-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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